Presidency

New evidence reveals that John Kennedy worked tirelessly for four years to win the White House, much longer than Theodore White and other historians had thought. It was the first modern campaign for President.

Charles Overby, founding CEO of the Newseum in Washington, D.C., recently interviewed long-time political reporters for the Boston Globe, Tom Oliphant and Curtis Wilkie, about revelations they uncovered in researching their new book about John F. Read more >>

After becoming President, George Washington undertook an extraordinary journey through all thirteen colonies to unite – and learn from – a diverse population of citizens. His quest to unite our nation and discover the "temper and disposition" of its people are an inspiration to us today.

The claim that “Washington Slept Here” is so ubiquitous in the historical community that it has become something of a running joke. Read more >>

In his second term, George Washington faced a crisis that threatened to tear apart the young Republic. His wife Martha later thought the bitterness of the debate may have hastened the President’s death, but Washington gave America the gift of peace, and an important precedent in leadership.

An impetuous and sometimes corrupt Congress has often hamstrung the efforts of the president since the earliest days of the Republic

On a little-remarked, steamy day in late June 1973, a revolution took place in Washington, D.C., one that would transfer far more power and wealth than did the revolt against King George III in 1776. Read more >>

Why Have Our Presidents Almost Always Stumbled After Their First Four Years?

An Interview With the President and the First Lady

A recent presidential edict will make it harder for historians to practice their trade.

Richard Brookhiser has spent four years trying to capture for the television screen the character of perhaps the greatest American.

Jack Kennedy came into the White House determined to dismantle his Republican predecessor’s rigid, formal staff organization in favor of a spontaneous, flexible, hands-on management style. Thirty years Bill Clinton seems determined to do the same thing. He would do well to remember that what it got JFK was the Bay of Pigs and the Vietnam War.

In early October of 1963, Rep. Clement Zablocki, a Wisconsin Democrat, led a House Foreign Affairs Committee fact-finding delegation to South Vietnam. Invited to the White House when he returned, Zablocki told President John F. Read more >>

They’ve all had things to say about their fellow Executives. Once in a great while one was even flattering.

John Adams said Thomas Jefferson’s mind was “eaten to a honeycomb with ambition, yet weak, confused, uninformed, and ignorant.” Ulysses S. Read more >>