Carte-de-visite of Lincoln's Bed

Date:
c. 1865

Bedroom image with large bed on small card, table in front with basket and books. Mismarked as Lincoln’s death bed, this image of Lincoln’s bed matches the bed seen in LIHO 10360. Several other items, including a sewing basket belonging to Mary Lincoln, and books known to belong to the Lincolns are on the table in front of the bed. The basket and books are in the Lincoln Home collection.

Description (physical):

Paper, cardboard. H 6.2 cm, W 10.2 cm

Location:
426 S. 7th St.Springfield,Illinois 62701
Identifier:
2010.0001.0012
Institution:
Lincoln Home National Historic Site

Wood Stove

Date:
1860

The Lincolns bought this stove in June 1860 from Eli Kreigh’s store in Springfield. It is said that Mrs. Lincoln was so happy with the way the stove worked she wanted to take it to Washington with her. Mr. Lincoln convinced her to leave it behind.

Description (physical):

Cast iron. H 68 cm, W 82 cm, D 113 cm (minus stove pipe)

Location:
426 S. 7th St.Springfield,Illinois 62701
Identifier:
2010.0001.0015
Institution:
Lincoln Home National Historic Site

President Lincoln On Battlefield Of Antietam

Date:
Oct, 1862
Publisher/Studio:
Philip and Solomons, Publishers_Gardner's Photographic Sketchbook

This image captures a meeting between President Lincoln and his generals after the Battle of Antietam. Lincoln frequently changed commanding generals and demanded success from his military subordinates. In the first half of the war, it was rare for a Union commanding general to lead in consecutive battles.

Location:
201 West Monument Street Baltimore,Maryland 21201
Identifier:
Z24.2267
Institution:
Maryland Historical Society

Lincoln Cane

Date:
1860s

Originally owned by President Abraham Lincoln and given to Frederick Douglass by Mary Todd Lincoln after her husband's death in recognition of Douglass' recruiting efforts during the Civil War. Mr. Douglass at his residence in Rochester, New York wrote a thank you letter to Mrs. Abraham Lincoln on August 17, 1865. In the letter he thanked Mrs. Lincoln for given him the late president Abraham Lincoln's favorite walking stick. Source: Life and Writings of Frederick Douglass, Vol. III. Edited by Philip S. Foner, 1950.

Description (physical):

Wood, metal, antler. L 89, D 13 cm

Location:
1411 W Street SE Washington,District of Columbia 20020
Identifier:
FRDO 1898
Institution:
Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

Letter From The Department Of The Interior

Date:
August 10, 1863

This letter from the Department of the Interior granted Frederick Douglass the right of a free man. Four signatures at bottom with Abraham Lincoln's on left (dated).

Description (physical):

Paper. L 24.5, W 19.5 cm

Location:
1411 W Street SE Washington,District of Columbia 20020
Identifier:
FRDO 3863
Institution:
Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

Antietam, Md. President Lincoln and Gen. George B. McClellan in the general's tent; another view

Date:
Oct3, 1862
Creator:
Alexander Gardner, (1821-1882)

This photograph depicts President Lincoln with Major General George B. McClellan, commander of the Army of the Potomac at Antietam. Lincoln and McClellan shared a complex relationship; Lincoln admired McClellan for his training and preparation of an army, but McClellan's deliberation and indecision tormented Lincoln. After Antietam, Lincoln replaced McClellan with Ambrose Burnside, and McClellan reappeared to challenge Lincoln in the 1864 presidential election.

Description (physical):

Glass, stereograph; wet collodion

Location:
10 1st St SE Washington,District of Columbia 20003
Identifier:
LC-DIG-cwpb-01131
Institution:
Library of Congress

Antietam, Md. Allan Pinkerton, President Lincoln, And Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand

Date:
Oct 3, 1862
Creator:
Alexander Gardner, (1821-1882)

This image shows President Lincoln with Major General John A. McClernand, a former Illinois politician and a close friend, and Allan Pinkerton, a detective and bodyguard for Lincoln.

Description (physical):

Glass, wet collodion

Location:
10 1st St SE Washington,District of Columbia 20003
Identifier:
LC-DIG-cwpb-04339
Institution:
Library of Congress

Wall Mirror

Date:
c. 1845

Mr. Lincoln was clean-shaven while living in Springfield. He used this ornate but small mirror to shave every morning. Shortly before the 1860 election, he received a letter from an eleven year-old girl suggesting that if he would grow a beard it would make him look better and then ladies could tease their husbands into voting for him. He waited until after the election before taking her suggestion and met the girl on his way to Washington.

Description (physical):

Wood, glass. H 73 cm, W 39 cm, D 15.8 cm

Location:
426 S. 7th St.Springfield,Illinois 62701
Identifier:
2010.0001.0001
Institution:
Lincoln Home National Historic Site