Austrian 6 Pounder Rifled Howitzer

Date:
1843
Publisher/Studio:
Vienna

This piece is an Austrian 6-pounder rifled howitzer manufactured at Vienna in 1843. Its weight is indicated at the forward end of the second reinforce as "7c 6f." In the Austrian measure of the time, this meant seven centners (hundredweight), six pfund (pound); the Austrian pfund weighed 1.23 of our pounds, making the weight of this howitzer 778.99 English pounds. This piece used what were called trunnion sights. An iron front sight blade is fixed to the right rimbase, and a portion of the right breech face is cut away to receive the rear sight. This piece is one of four in the Navy Yards collection (two more in Leutze Park, one in the Navy Memorial Museum) purchased by the Confederacy and captured in the blockade runner Columbia in 1862.

Description (physical):

Material: Bronze. Wt: 778.99 lbs.

Location:
805 Kidder Breese Street SE 20374
Identifier:
61-84-AS
Institution:
Naval Historical Center

Dunker Church Dead

Creator:
Walton Taber

Reproduction of a sketch of a photograph of Confederate dead near Dunker Church after the Battle of Antietam. Early in the battle on September 17, 1862, General George B. McClellan concentrated his forces on this church in an attempt to prevent General Robert E. Lee's Confederates from advancing further into northern territory.

Description (physical):

H: 8", W: 10"

Location:
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Identifier:
2010.0002.0027
Institution:
American Heritage Archives

Spot On Maryland Heights Where The Union Troops Surrendered

Creator:
Alfred R. Waud (1828-1891)

Reproduction of sketch. On September 12-15, 1862, Union and Confederate forces confronted one another at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. On the final day of battle, the Union Col. Dixon S. Miles began to doubt that reinforcements from Gen. George B. McClellan would arrive in time and surrendered. After deciding to surrender, he was mortally wounded by an artillery shell.

Description (physical):

H: 8", W: 10". Original: Pencil on buff paper touched with whit. H: 5 3/8", W: 10 3/8"

Location:
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Identifier:
2010.0002.0025
Institution:
American Heritage Archives

Halt In Line Of Battle, Antietam

Date:
1862
Creator:
Edwin Forbes (1839-1895)

This reproduction of a print by American landscape painter and etcher Edwin Forbes (1839-1895) shows Union soldiers holding the line of battle at Antietam on September 17, 1862.

Description (physical):

H: 8 1/8", W: 10"

Location:
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Identifier:
2010.0002.0005
Institution:
American Heritage Archives

Ball's Bluff

Date:
c. 1861

Generals Nathan G. Evans (Confederate) and Charles Pomeroy Stone (Union) are here depicted gambling at the Battle of Ball's Bluff as the soldiers under Stone's command perilously cross the Potomac. During the battle, there were not enough boats for all the soldiers to cross quickly. After managing to transport soldiers into Virginia, Union forces fought Confederate forces until shortly after nightfall. They ultimately lost the battle, though their defeat was minor in comparison to later battles. However, it provoked outrage from Washington, largely due to the death of Edward Dickinson Baker, a sitting Senator from Oregon and commander of the California Brigade. Stone was treated as a scapegoat for the loss, and the Congressional Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War was established in its aftermath to oversee generals' actions.

Description (physical):

H: 9 1/8", W: 13 5/8"

Location:
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Identifier:
2010.0002.0002
Institution:
American Heritage Archives

Battle of Ball's Bluff, VA. Rescuing the Body of Brig. Gen. Baker.

Date:
c. 1861

Edward Dickinson Baker, a close friend of Abraham Lincoln, U.S. Senator from Oregon, and commander of the California Brigade, as killed at the Battle of Ball's Bluff in Northern Virginia on October 21, 1861. He is the only sitting Senator ever to have been killed in battle.

Description (physical):

H: 6 7/8", W: 8 7/16"

Location:
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Identifier:
2010.0002.0001
Institution:
American Heritage Archives

Boots

Boots like these were worn by children in the 19th century.

Description (physical):

Leather. L 19, W 8, H 19 cm

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0014
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial

Willie Marshall

Grand-nephew of Robert E. Lee, his grandmother was Anne Marshall, Robert E. Lee’s eldest sister. She was a staunch Unionist who was married to a judge in Baltimore, MD. Lee wrote a letter to Anne on the day he resigned from the US Army. The letter described, in very personal terms, his reasons for siding with Virginia against the US Government. He wrote, “With all my devotion to the Union and the feeling of loyalty and duty of an American citizen, I have not been able to make up my mind to raise my hand against my relatives, my children, my home…I know you will blame me; but you must think as kindly of me as you can, and believe that I have endeavored to do what I thought right.”

Description (physical):

Paper. L 32.8, W 18.3 cm

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0012
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial

Martha [markie] Custis Williams

Date:
c. 1839
Creator:
Captain William G. Williams

This portrait of Markie was painted by her father when she was about twelve years old. It is believed to have hung in Markie’s room upstairs at Arlington House between 1853 and 1861. Markie, a favorite cousin of the Lee family, moved to Arlington to help care for the elderly George Washington Parke Custis after the death of his wife in 1853. She became a confidant of Robert E. Lee’s. An ardent Unionist, Markie nonetheless remained very close to her cousins throughout the Civil War and to the end of her life. During the war she rescued many items from the house to prevent their theft by Union soldiers.

Description (physical):

L 48.9, W 38.4, D 2.7 cm

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0011
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial

Mary Cusits Lee

Photograph of the oldest daughter of Robert and Mary Lee, Mary, nicknamed “Sister.” She was an independent woman and defied convention for women of her day and traveled the world after the Civil War. She lived the longest of all the children, surviving until the end of World War I in 1918.

Description (physical):

Paper. L 23, W 18 cm

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0010
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial