Mrs. Robert E. Lee

Date:
c. 1865-1870
Creator:
M. Miley, Lexington, VA

This carte-de-visite portrays Mrs. Lee during the time her husband was president of Washington College.

Description (physical):

Paper. W 6.3, L 10.4 cm

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0001
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial

George Washington

Description (physical):

Paper. W 6.3, L 10 cm

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0013
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial

Boots

Boots like these were worn by children in the 19th century.

Description (physical):

Leather. L 19, W 8, H 19 cm

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0014
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial

Terrestrial Globe

Date:
c.1800s
Creator:
Cary Brothers, London, England

This globe was found in the attic of Arlington House in 1928 during roof repair. Tradition has it that the globe has never left the property since the Lees lived there. This globe was probably used to teach world geography to Mrs. Lee as a girl and later to her own children. Since the Custises and Lees taught the enslaved people of Arlington, it is likely that they also used this globe.

Description (physical):

Papier-mâché, paper, gesso, gauze, brass, wood. H 42.5, D 42.5 cm (globe D 30 cm)

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0016
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial

The First Primary Reader

Date:
1859
Creator:
Brewster & Tileston, Boston

Handwritten inside cover, “Presented to Charlie E. Thorne by Brig. General DeRussy at Arlington House which was left by the Rebel Genl. R.E. Lee, July 1864.”

Description (physical):

Paper. L 17, W 10.5 cm

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0017
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial

Table

Date:
Late 18th Century

This table belonged to Martha Washington at Mount Vernon. It later belonged to Mrs. George Goldsborough, great-granddaughter of Martha Washington. It is believed George Washington Parke Custis brought it to Arlington in 1802. After Martha Washington died, Custis spent over $4,000 at estate sales at Mount Vernon, collecting as many Washington belongings as possible. It was his intention to create a “treasury” of Washington possessions to show the world. During Custis' early years at Arlington, most of what he owned came from Mount Vernon and had some connection with the president and first lady.

Description (physical):

Wood. H 70.6, W 48.1, L 38.1 cm

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0018
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial

Chair

Date:
c. 1825

This chair was used at Arlington House. George Washington Parke Custis entertained frequently. It was part of his role as a gentleman but also his role as the “Child of Mount Vernon.” Guests included presidents and vice-presidents, senators, congressmen, supreme court justices as well as leading figures in agriculture and the arts.

Description (physical):

Mahogany. H 87.5, W 41.3, L 38.8 cm

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0019
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial

Chair

Description: Bowback Windsor writing arm chair with a small drawer underneath the writing surface; screws are covered with wooden plugs; originally painted. The chair descended in the family of Mrs. Charles Levin Powell (nee Selina Lloyd), a close childhood friend of Mary Custis Lee. George Washington Parke Custis used this chair, and was fond of writing. His favorite subjects were the life of Washington and the ideals of the American Revolution. His writings were intended to stimulate Americans to love and serve their country. He also wrote articles and speeches denouncing slavery as “the mightiest serpent that ever infested the Earth” and called on slave owners to free their slaves and send them to Liberia in West Africa.

Description (physical):

Wood, bamboo. H 94.2, W 81.6 cm

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0020
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial

Dancing Girl

Painted by an unknown artist and presented to Mrs. Lee. It hung for many years under Washington's portrait in the parlor of Arlington House. It reflects the Custises’ and Lees’ fondness and appreciation for art and perhaps even their unconventionality. Mildred Lee inherited the painting which she gave to the donor, Mr. George Upshur.

Description (physical):

Oil, canvas. L 15.0, W 18.1 cm

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0021
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial

Willie Marshall

Grand-nephew of Robert E. Lee, his grandmother was Anne Marshall, Robert E. Lee’s eldest sister. She was a staunch Unionist who was married to a judge in Baltimore, MD. Lee wrote a letter to Anne on the day he resigned from the US Army. The letter described, in very personal terms, his reasons for siding with Virginia against the US Government. He wrote, “With all my devotion to the Union and the feeling of loyalty and duty of an American citizen, I have not been able to make up my mind to raise my hand against my relatives, my children, my home…I know you will blame me; but you must think as kindly of me as you can, and believe that I have endeavored to do what I thought right.”

Description (physical):

Paper. L 32.8, W 18.3 cm

Location:
Arlington National Cemetery Arlington,Virginia 22211
Identifier:
2010.0002.0012
Institution:
Arlington House-The Robert E. Lee Memorial