General Robert E. Lee CSA (1807-1870)

Date:
C. 1860s

The future of the first Confederate military campaign into Northern territory depended entirely upon Robert E. Lee's plan to deal with the Union soldiers at Harpers Ferry. Before he could pursue his goal to invade Pennsylvania and destroy the Union army in a pitched battle, Lee had to eliminate the Federal garrison at Harpers Ferry. Lee's daring plan to capture Harpers Ferry divided his army into four parts separated by mountains and rivers. He knew that his soldiers were tired and poorly fed, and that many of them had been marching barefoot for six weeks. Read more »

Location:
West Virginia,Harpers Ferry,25425
Identifier:
2011.5.0035
Institution:
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park

Lee's Young Artillerist

Date:
1995
Creator:
Carmichael, Peter S.
Publisher/Studio:
Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia
Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

From Selma To Appomatox

Date:
1994
Creator:
Laboda, Lawrence R.
Publisher/Studio:
New York, NY: Oxford University Press
Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

Welcome To The Hour Of Conflict: William Cowan Mcclellan And The Ninth Alabama

Date:
2007
Creator:
Carter, John C.
Publisher/Studio:
Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press

Welcome the Hour of Conflict: William Cowan McClellan and the 9th Alabama by William C. McClellan, Edited by John C. Carter Letters from a young Confederate in Lee's Army. In the spring of 1861 a 22-year-old Alabamian did what many of his friends and colleagues were doing?he joined the Confederate Army as a volunteer. The first of his family to enlist, William Cowan McClellan, who served as a private in the 9th Alabama Infantry regiment, wrote hundreds of letters throughout the war, often penning for friends who could not write home for themselves. In the letters collected in John C. Carter's volume, this young soldier comments on his feelings toward his commanding officers, his attitude toward military discipline and camp life, his disdain for the western Confederate armies, and his hopes and fears for the future of the Confederacy. McClellan's letters also contain vivid descriptions of camp life, battles, marches, picket duty, and sickness and disease in the army. The correspondence between McClellan and his family dealt with separation due to war as well as with other wartime difficulties such as food shortages, invasion, and occupation. The letters also show the rise and fall of morale on both the home front and on the battlefield, and how they were closely intertwined. Remarkable for their humor, literacy, and matter-of-fact banter, the letters reveal the attitude a common soldier in the Army of Northern Virginia had toward the day-to-day activity and progression of the war. John C. Carter includes helpful appendixes that list the letters chronologically and offer the regimental roster, casualty/enlistment totals, assignments, and McClellan's personal military record. John C. Carter is a Civil War enthusiast and independent researcher employed by Christopher Newport University in Newport News, Virginia.

Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier