Stonewall in the Valley: Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's Shenandoah Valley Campaign, Spring 1862

Date:
1961
Creator:
Tanner, Robert
Publisher/Studio:
Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co.
Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

Spies For The Blue And Gray

Date:
1986
Creator:
Kane, Harnett
Publisher/Studio:
Garden City, NY: Hanover House
Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

Army Of The Potomac: Mcclellan Takes Command

Date:
2004
Creator:
Beatie, Russel H.
Publisher/Studio:
Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press

This is the second volume in a series whose first volume appeared in 1961 (Road to Manassas: The Growth of Union Command in the Eastern Theater from the Fall of Fort Sumter to the First Battle of Bull Run). The author is a trial attorney in New York City and wrote these books in his spare time. Nonetheless, this book is exhaustively researched and based entirely on primary sources. It attempts to give us a fresh understanding of the leaders of the army and the political forces that shaped their decisions. This volume covers just the six months between the First Bull Run and McClellan's preparations for the Peninsula Campaign. The author believes McClellan "more sinned against than sinning" in a departure from much current historical thought.

Description (physical):

Hardback, 636p with index, 6" x 9.5"

Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

Antietam, Maryland. Picnic Party At Antietam Bridge

Date:
Sep22, 1862
Creator:
Alexander Gardner, (1821-1882)

This image, published just days after the Battle of Antietam, depicts a small picnic party on Antietam Creek.

Description (physical):

Glass, stereograph; wet collodion

Location:
10 1st St SE Washington,District of Columbia 20003
Identifier:
LC-DIG-cwpb-00251
Institution:
Library of Congress

Enfield Rifle

Date:
1853

Both sides imported large quantities of European firearms to assist them in arming their troops. The most widely used was the British Pattern 1853 Enfield rifle-musket because it was accurate and well made. An important factor for both sides was that the .58 caliber bullet used by both Union and Confederate forces was interchangeable with the .577 Enfield. Its overall length totaled 55 1/4 inches and weighed about 9 pounds. Hundreds of thousands of Enfield rifle-muskets were successfully smuggled into the South by the Confederacy during the war.

Description (physical):

L: 55.25", Wt: 9 lbs.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.002
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Cook Carbine

Date:
1864
Creator:
Cook and Brother: Athens, GA

This .58 caliber carbine was manufactured by the firm of Cook and Brother of Athens, Georgia, and is dated 1864. The Cook firm produced exceptionally well-made weapons patterned after English Enfield types. From 1861 to 1862 the firm was located at New Orleans, Louisiana, but was forced to leave with the approach of Northern troops. In 1863 the firm settled in Athens, Georgia, where it continued to manufacture firearms.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.003
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Model 1859 Sharps Rifle

Hiram Berdan was a successful engineer and inventor before the Civil War. With the commencement of the war, Berdan was permitted to organize units of sharpshooters, which would consist of the most accomplished marksman from the Northern states. The result was Berdan’s 1st and 2nd regiments of U.S. Sharpshooters. These units soon became legendary for their expert marksmanship and respectable battle record. From 1862, most of Berdan’s men were armed with Sharps rifles. These were breech-loading rifles that were easily and quickly loaded. Furthermore, they proved to fire accurately and became the favorite weapon of the men. This Model 1859 rifle is of the type used by these organizations.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.004
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Spencer Carbine

The Spencer carbine was one of the most popular firearms of the Civil War though it was not issued until the latter part of 1863. Its distinguishing feature is that it had a magazine that could hold seven metallic rimfire cartridges, which were fed to the breech by a compressed spring in the magazine. The magazine was loaded through the butt of the rifle. When the trigger guard was lowered, the breech block dropped down, and the spent cartridge case was ejected. As the trigger guard returned to its normal position, the breech block moved up and in the process, caught a new cartridge and inserted it in the breech. To expedite the loading process, the Blakeslee quick-loading cartridge box was designed, which held several loaded magazines that could be quickly inserted in the butt. In all, more than 95,000 Spencer carbines were purchased during the war by the federal government.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.005
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Blakeslee Cartridge Box

Creator:
Erastus Blakeslee

The Blakeslee cartridge box was designed by Erastus Blakeslee of the 1st Connecticut Volunteer Cavalry. He received U.S. patent number 45,469 for the cartridge box on December 20, 1864. It was made in three different sizes of wood and covered with leather. One type could hold up to six metal tubes filled with seven metallic Spencer cartridges, while others could hold ten or thirteen tubes. With this cartridge box, a soldier could quickly load his Spencer carbine or rifle by taking a tube out of the box and pouring the seven cartridges into the butt of the firearm.

Description (physical):

Material: Wood, Leather.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.006
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Burnside Carbine

Creator:
Ambrose E. Burnside
Publisher/Studio:
Bristol Rifle Company

The .54 caliber Burnside carbine was designed and patented by Ambrose E. Burnside. This weapon was manufactured in Rhode Island by the Bristol Firearms Company and later, its successor, the Burnside Rifle Company, from about 1857 to 1865. Throughout these years, five different models were manufactured. Lowering the trigger guard, which also served as the operating lever, would cause the breech to tilt up, revealing a cone-shaped cavity. The metallic cartridge for the Burnside, of a unique cone shape, was placed into this cavity. Closing the lever rotated the breech block into position, placing the cartridge in the chamber. A percussion ignition system with an external hammer fired the carbine. A small hole at the base of the cartridge would allow the fire to pass through and ignite the powder in the case. The Burnside was the third most used carbine utilized by the Union cavalry, exceeded only by the Sharps and Spencer carbines. The most serious complaint about this carbine was the tendency of the cartridge to stick in the breech once it was fired.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.007
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History