Portrait Of William F. Lynch

Date:
C. 1860s
Location:
805 Kidder Breese Street SE,District of Columbia,Washington,20374
Identifier:
2011.021.0014
Institution:
National Museum of the U.S. Navy
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Kerr's Patent Revolver

Date:
c. 1860
Creator:
London Armoury Company
Description (physical):

.44 Caliber

Location:
1195 Baltimore Pike,Pennsylvania,Gettysburg,17325
Identifier:
2010.7517.0007
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M1841 12-lb. Howitzer

Date:
December 1862
Creator:
Noble & Brothers Foundry
Description (physical):

Bronze

Location:
1713 Southwest 11th Street Lawton, OK 73501 ,Oklahoma,Lawton,73501
Identifier:
2010.7100.0002
Institution:
National Artillery Museum
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Lock And Key For Jefferson Davis

Location:
20 Bernard Rd,Virginia,Hampton,23651
Identifier:
2010.1234.0002
Institution:
Fort Monroe Casemate Museum
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Harper's Ferry, As Evacuated by the Confederate Troops

Date:
July 6, 1861
Publisher/Studio:
Harper's Weekly

This reproduction of a print in Harper's Weekly shows a view of the confluence of the Potomac and the Shenandoah Rivers to the east of Harper's Ferry. Soldiers mull about; a lone cannon sits in the foreground. Confederates moved the arms stored at the Harpers Ferry arsenal to a more secure location in the Confederate capital of Richmond in 1861. The Confederate and Union armies would meet near the city for the Battle of Harpers Ferry on September 12-15, 1862.

Description (physical):

H: 8", W: 10"

Location:
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Identifier:
2010.0002.0006
Institution:
American Heritage Archives

Mosby's crutches

These crutches were used by John Mosby during the Civil War. He described them thus: “These crutches were made for me during the war by a slave named Isaac who belonged to my father. They were first used in August 1863 when I went home wounded. My mother kept them for me and I again used them in September 1864 & December 1864.” General Robert E. Lee once said to Mosby, after seeing him on crutches at his headquarters, “The only fault I have to find with your conduct, Colonel Mosby, is that you are always getting wounded.”

Description (physical):

Material: wood.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.039
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Mosby's hat

This slouch hat was worn by John Mosby. According to Virgil Carrington Jones, author of Grey Ghosts and Rebel Raiders, this hat was left behind in a house in Rector’s Cross Roads, Virginia, where Mosby was seriously wounded by a detachment of federal cavalry in December, 1864. Forty years later, it was returned to him by the daughter of a 13th New York Cavalry officer.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.037
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Mosby's jacket

This cavalry jacket was worn by John Mosby during the war.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.036
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

General Orders From J.E.B. Stuart

Date:
Mar 12, 1863

These general orders from J. E. B. Stuart, dated March 12, 1863, praise Captain John Singleton Mosby for his skill and daring, in particular the capture of Brigadier General Edwin H. Stoughton and thirty of his men in Fairfax, Virginia, in the early morning hours of March 8, 1863. The Union forces stationed a few miles away were unaware that Mosby and his men were in the vicinity; Stoughton, who’s quarters were miles from his soldiers’s, proved an easy target. He was awakened from his slumber by Mosby and informed that he was now a prisoner of Mosby’s Rangers.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington, District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.035
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Destruction of the Railroad Bridge over the Potomac, at Harper's Ferry, by the Rebels, June 15, 1861

Date:
June 15, 1861
Publisher/Studio:
Harper's Weekly

This reproduction of a print in Harper's Weekly shows soldiers observing an explosion on a railroad bridge in Harpers Ferry. Confederates moved the arms stored at the Harpers Ferry arsenal to a more secure location in the Confederate capital of Richmond in 1861. The Confederate and Union armies would meet near the city for the Battle of Harpers Ferry on September 12-15, 1862.

Description (physical):

H: 8", W: 10"

Location:
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Identifier:
2010.0002.0008
Institution:
American Heritage Archives