U.S. Treasury Guards Flag

Date:
c. 1865

Dramatically associated with the close of the war, this flag decorated the front of the Presidential box at Ford Theater, in Washington, D.C. on the night of April 14th, 1865. Booth, President Abraham Lincoln's assassin, caught his spur and tore this flag as he jumped from the Presidential Box to the stage below.

Description (physical):

Silk. 71 1/2" x 77 1/2"

Location:
511 10th Street, NW Washington,District of Columbia 20004
Identifier:
2010.0006.0002
Institution:
Ford's Theatre National Historic Site

Cook Carbine

Date:
1864
Creator:
Cook and Brother: Athens, GA

This .58 caliber carbine was manufactured by the firm of Cook and Brother of Athens, Georgia, and is dated 1864. The Cook firm produced exceptionally well-made weapons patterned after English Enfield types. From 1861 to 1862 the firm was located at New Orleans, Louisiana, but was forced to leave with the approach of Northern troops. In 1863 the firm settled in Athens, Georgia, where it continued to manufacture firearms.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.003
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Tarpley Breech-loading Carbine

Creator:
Jere H. Tarpley
Publisher/Studio:
J. and F. Garrett Company

This .52 caliber carbine was invented by Jere H. Tarpley, of Greensboro, North Carolina, who was granted a patent by the Confederate government in February 1863. During the years 1863–1864, it was made by the J. and F. Garrett Company of Greensboro. Tarpley carbines were rare. Only a few hundred were made.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.008
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

J. H. Dance And Brothers Revolver

Creator:
J. H. Dance and Brothers

This rare six-shot Confederate revolver was made in .36 and .44 calibers. Soon after the Civil War began, the Confederate government and individual states issued a call for firearms. As a result, a large variety of firearms—from flintlock rifles, pistols, and shotguns to current weaponry seized from federal properties—was used by Confederate soldiers at the beginning of the conflict. It became expedient for the South to begin manufacturing guns to keep their troops armed. Those organizations that did begin manufacturing arms largely used United States weapons as models, though this model is distinguishable by the lack of recoil shield protrusions on the frame. J. H. Dance and Brothers of Columbia, Texas, modeled their revolvers after the Colt Dragoon. The firm started manufacturing firearms in 1862. The men who worked for this company were granted exemption from military service by the state because the need for firearms was so great. In 1863 the workshop was moved farther inland due to fear that the Union gunboats would shell it, but operations apparently ceased following the move. Approximately 325 to 500 revolvers were manufactured by this firm.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.014
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Confederate Enlisted Man's Uniform

Date:
c. 1861

A Confederate enlisted man’s shell jacket made of grayish brown wool. This coarse and simple uniform became widely used by Confederate troops, particularly in the Western Theater. The uniform was originally gray in appearance but turned a "butternut brown" when exposed to the sun. The dye used in these inexpensive wool and cotton blend uniforms often came from butternuts, walnut shells, and rust. Their earth-tone color is what caused the Federals to sometimes call Rebels "Butternuts."

Description (physical):

Wool, wooden buttons. H 58.0 cm, W 44.0 cm

Location:
1195 Baltimore Pike Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325
Identifier:
2010.0005.0002
Institution:
Gettysburg National Military Park