D'Angelico Teardrop

Date:
1957
Creator:
John D'Angelico
Publisher/Studio:
New York, NY

Throughout the 20th century, guitar makers have experimented with the archtop design, modifying the instrument in shape and size. The teardrop shape that John D'Angelico custom-created in this instrument is not only aesthetically striking but also increases the sound chamber of the body. The guitar's design is based on D'Angelico's New Yorker model, with the teardrop addition. During his career John D'Angelico built 1,164 guitars, and they are considered among the finest archtops ever made.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.009
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

D'Aquisto Advance Archtop

Date:
1995
Creator:
James D'Aquisto
Publisher/Studio:
Greenport, NY

Innovation and experimentation in the shapes and sounds of guitars continue today. James D'Aquisto began working in John D'Angelico's shop in the 1950s and, after D'Angelico's death in 1964, continued the tradition of building high-quality archtop guitars. Over time D'Aquisto experimented with design changes, and his own signature style began to evolve. In 1995, D'Aquisto crafted experimental sound holes with removable baffles to control the volume ranges of this blue archtop guitar.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.01
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Gibson Flying V

Date:
1958
Publisher/Studio:
Kalamazoo, MI: Gibson Inc.

Designed by Gibson president Ted McCarty, the Flying V was the firm's first boldly shaped electric guitar, introduced in 1958. It was developed as part of a modernistic line of guitars which included the Explorer and the never-manufactured Moderne. But the design proved too extreme—sales lagged and production ended within two years. Then in the late 1960s, musicians like Albert King and Jimi Hendrix helped revive the popularity of the Flying V, and this induced guitar makers to develop other adventurous designs.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Washington, DC 20013-7012
Identifier:
10.033
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Mosrite Custom

Date:
1980
Publisher/Studio:
Bakersfield, CA: Mosrite Company

This guitar was handmade by Mosrite Company founder Semie Moseley, in gratitude to a financial backer. The body is laminated walnut and maple, and the bronze hardware was cast from molds. Its frets were uniquely designed to reduce neck vibration, connecting to an interior bar that runs through the length of the guitar's neck.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
10.04
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History