Candle Wicking From Cotton Mill

Date:
1849-1852
Location:
West Virginia,Harpers Ferry,25425
Identifier:
2011.1022.0007
Institution:
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
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Percussion Musket

Date:
1854

Model 1841 Harpers Ferry Musket, 69 caliber. Although outmoded by the beginning of the Civil War, weapons of this type were used by soldiers of both sides.

Description (physical):

Wood, iron. L 148 cm

Location:
1195 Baltimore Pike Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325
Identifier:
2010.0005.0034
Institution:
Gettysburg National Military Park

M1855 Harpers Ferry

Date:
1859

U.S. HARPERS FERRY M1855 RIFLE, .58 CAL. PERCUSSION. ALL IRON MOUNTED; LOCK DATED: 1859; BARREL FLATS STAMPED: PO-KEEPSIE N-Y" (ABOVE STD. V/P/EAGLEHEAD PROOF MARKS); SINGLE LEAF M1866 TYPE REAR SIGHT WITH 2 APERTURES (REMOVED/ REPLACED WITH REPRODUCTION M1855 SIGHT); NO VISIBLE STOCK INSPECTOR MARKS; MISSING FRONT SIDE SCREW; NO SPARE CONE IN PATCHBOX. Origin: HARPERS FERRY, VIRGINIA.

Description (physical):

Material: Iron, Wood. L: 124.5 Cm.

Location:
12521 Lee Highway Manassas, Virginia 20109
Identifier:
MANA 618
Institution:
Manassas National Battlefield Park

"when I Wish To Catch Rats, I First Stop Their Holes."

This reproduction of an engraving implies that gaining control of Harpers Ferry, Virginia, would allow the Union army to neutralize threats from other Confederate cities. General Winfield Scott, who held command of the Union army until his resignation on November 1, 1861, is credited with the quote at bottom.

Description (physical):

H: 9 7/8", W: 7 15/16"

Location:
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Identifier:
2010.0002.0012
Institution:
American Heritage Archives

Destruction of the Railroad Bridge over the Potomac, at Harper's Ferry, by the Rebels, June 15, 1861

Date:
June 15, 1861
Publisher/Studio:
Harper's Weekly

This reproduction of a print in Harper's Weekly shows soldiers observing an explosion on a railroad bridge in Harpers Ferry. Confederates moved the arms stored at the Harpers Ferry arsenal to a more secure location in the Confederate capital of Richmond in 1861. The Confederate and Union armies would meet near the city for the Battle of Harpers Ferry on September 12-15, 1862.

Description (physical):

H: 8", W: 10"

Location:
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Identifier:
2010.0002.0008
Institution:
American Heritage Archives

Harper's Ferry, As Evacuated by the Confederate Troops

Date:
July 6, 1861
Publisher/Studio:
Harper's Weekly

This reproduction of a print in Harper's Weekly shows a view of the confluence of the Potomac and the Shenandoah Rivers to the east of Harper's Ferry. Soldiers mull about; a lone cannon sits in the foreground. Confederates moved the arms stored at the Harpers Ferry arsenal to a more secure location in the Confederate capital of Richmond in 1861. The Confederate and Union armies would meet near the city for the Battle of Harpers Ferry on September 12-15, 1862.

Description (physical):

H: 8", W: 10"

Location:
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Identifier:
2010.0002.0006
Institution:
American Heritage Archives

Spot On Maryland Heights Where The Union Troops Surrendered

Creator:
Alfred R. Waud (1828-1891)

Reproduction of sketch. On September 12-15, 1862, Union and Confederate forces confronted one another at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. On the final day of battle, the Union Col. Dixon S. Miles began to doubt that reinforcements from Gen. George B. McClellan would arrive in time and surrendered. After deciding to surrender, he was mortally wounded by an artillery shell.

Description (physical):

H: 8", W: 10". Original: Pencil on buff paper touched with whit. H: 5 3/8", W: 10 3/8"

Location:
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Identifier:
2010.0002.0025
Institution:
American Heritage Archives