General McClellan Entering Frederick

Date:
Oct4, 1862
Publisher/Studio:
Harper's Weekly

This print shows the support General McClellan, then the commander of the Army of the Potomac, received upon his arrival in Maryland. McClellan reassembled the Army of the Potomac to check the Confederate advance into Maryland, eventually driving off the Rebels after the Battle of Antietam.

Location:
201 West Monument Street Baltimore, Maryland 21201
Identifier:
Z24.1407
Institution:
Maryland Historical Society

John Carnan Ridgely

Date:
1841
Creator:
Thomas Sully

John Ridgely (1790-1867) was the first child born in Hampton Hall and third master of the estate.  He became the heir after the untimely death of his elder brother, Charles Carnan Ridgely, Jr. (1783-1819). When his father Charles Carnan Ridgely died in 1829, the Hampton “empire” was largely reduced. John's inheritance encompassed only a courtesy entail of about 4,500 acres. John's life was not marked by the ambition or prominence of Hampton's first two masters. He never held public office; his interests were largely confined to his estate and its development and improvement. A family member later observed, “He had a great passion for horses and the out door life” and for driving carriages at “full speed,” whereby he “was accustomed to do the [10-mile] distance from the City to Hampton in an hour or less.” The leading American portraitist Thomas Sully (1783-1872) painted this flattering yet accurate depiction late in his lengthy career.

Description (physical):

Material: Oil on canvas. H: 76.8cm, W: 64.1cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP1114
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

Eliza Eichelberger Ridgely

Date:
1950 (after 1818 original)
Creator:
C. G. Stapko (after Thomas Sully)

In 1828, John Ridgely married his second wife, Eliza Eichelberger Ridgely (1803-1867), daughter of Nicholas Greenbury Ridgely (1770-1829), a prominent and prosperous Baltimore merchant. Although the two believed they were distant cousins, no common descent for the two Ridgely families has been unquestionably established. Considered “one of the loveliest & most accomplished women ever raised in the city of Baltimore,” Eliza was well educated by the standards of the day, fluent in French and Italian, and an international traveler with sophisticated taste. She was particularly renowned as a horticulturalist and made numerous improvements to the gardens and grounds of Hampton. Her famous portrait at age 15 by Thomas Sully (1783-1872), "Lady with a Harp," also reflects her musical talents. The sale of the original painting to National Gallery of Art led to the preservation of Hampton and its gift to the National Park Service in 1948.

Description (physical):

Material: Oil on canvas. H: 214.7cm, W: 134cm.     

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP1190
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

Charles Ridgely

Date:
1868
Creator:
John E. Robertson

Hampton’s fourth master Charles Ridgely (1830-1872) was the second child of John Ridgely (1790-1867) and Eliza Eichelberger Ridgely (1803-1867). He received his early education at the highly regarded Mr. McNally’s school in Baltimore, went briefly to school in Paris in the winter of 1847-1848, and graduated from Harvard University. After his marriage in 1851 to his first cousin Margaretta Sophia Howard Ridgely (1824-1904), he assumed much of the responsibility for managing the Hampton estate. The painting is signed “Robertson” on the lower right, probably for the Liverpool-born artist John E. Robertson (1820-1879) who was active as a portrait painter in Baltimore in the 1860s.

Description (physical):

Material: Oil on canvas. H: 76.2cm, W: 64.2cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP848
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

John Ridgely, Jr.

Date:
1940

The Hampton herd of registered Jersey cattle continued to be a significant part of the life and business of the estate into the mid-20th century. John Ridgely, Jr. (1882-1959) is seen in this snapshot taken from the Ridgely family’s final decade as owners of Hampton with two fine calves from the herd.

Description (physical):

Material: Paper. L: 20cm, W: 25cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP4325
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

John Ridgely, Jr., Jane Rodney Ridgely, And Servant

Date:
1948
Creator:
A. Aubrey Bodine

This image, taken by renowned Maryland photographer A. Aubrey Bodine, was published on the cover of the Baltimore Sun magazine in June, 1948. John Ridgely, Jr. (1882-1959) and his second wife, Jane Rodney Ridgely (1902-1978), and a servant are seen on the front steps of Hampton taking leave of the mansion after its sale to the National Park Service. The Ridgelys then moved across Hampton Lane to the Farm House, which remained in the family until after Jane’s death in 1978. After that, it too became part of Hampton National Historic Site.

Description (physical):

Material: Paper. H: 18cm, W: 13cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP22491
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

Louise Roman Humichouse Ridgely

Date:
1907
Publisher/Studio:
Kajiwaba Studio

Louise Roman Humichouse (1883-1934) wed John Ridgely, Jr. (1882-1959), Hampton’s sixth and final master, in 1907. This formal wedding photograph by Kajiwaba Studio, was taken in her hometown of Hagerstown, Maryland. After their marriage, John and Louise built their own home about a half mile west of Hampton Mansion at 503 Hampton Lane, where the couple resided until her death in 1934.

Description (physical):

Material: Paper. H: 22cm, W: 15.7cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP3481
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

Tea Service

Date:
1907
Publisher/Studio:
Baltimore, MD: Jacobi & Jenkins

This service was made at time of the marriage of Louise Roman Humichouse (1883-1934) to John Ridgely, Jr. (1882-1959) in 1907. The elegant six–piece set, comprised of a teapot, coffee pot, hot water pot on stand, waste bowl, sugar bowl, and cream pitcher, reflects the designs of Baltimore silver of a century earlier. Following family tradition, the Ridgely stag’s head crest is engraved on the side of each piece.

Description (physical):

Material: Silver. H 19.7, L 26.7 cm; W 10.2, H 20.5 cm; L 26.7 cm; W 12, H 32.1 cm; L 24.7, W 15.2 cm; H 13, L 13.3 cm; W 10.2, H 16.9 cm; L 19, W 8.3 cm; H 14.6, L 13.7 cm; W 7.3 cm

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP38468_38469_38470_38471_38472_38473
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

The Hampton Company Brochure

Date:
1930

In 1929, John Ridgely, Jr. formed The Hampton Company for the purpose of selling lands from the Hampton estate for development. The brochure notes “Part of this historic acreage will be developed into a section of small country estates,” and entices “the man of means” through “location, surroundings, natural beauty…modern facilities and steadily enhancing values.”

Description (physical):

Material: Paper. H: 23cm, W: 10.5cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP2843_brochure01, HAMP2843_brochure02, HAMP2843_brochure06
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

John Ridgely Iii And Lillian Ketcham Ridgely

Date:
1940

John Ridgely III (1911-1990) and Lillian Ketcham Ridgely (1908-1996) are seen in this snapshot as a young married couple. Although John was never officially a master of the Hampton estate, as the eldest son of John Ridgely, Jr. (1882-1959) and Louise Roman Humichouse Ridgely (1883-1934), he and his wife played significant roles in the management of the property. The couple lived for several years at Hampton during the late 1930s, where Lil’s efforts focused on the restoration of Hampton’s gardens.

Description (physical):

Material: Paper. L: 9cm, W: 12.5cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP22475
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site