Lakota Model Baby Carrier With Porcupine-quill Embroidery, North Or South Dakota, Ca. 1880

Date:
1880

This Lakota baby carrier is a featured item in the Our Universes collection. The collection focuses on indigenous cosmologies--worldviews and philosophies related to the creation and order of the universe--and the spiritual relationship between humankind and the natural world. Organized around the solar year, the exhibition introduces visitors to indigenous peoples from across the Western Hemisphere who continue to express the wisdom of their ancestors in celebration, language, art, spirituality, and daily life.

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
12.2308.
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Blackfeet woman's beaded dress, ca. 1890

Date:
1890

This dress, made by the Blackfeet tribe, represents the Our Peoples collection. The collection details the interactions between American Indians and Europeans over the last 500 years. In the struggle for survival, nearly every Native community wrestled with the impact of deadly new diseases and weaponry, the weakening of traditional spirituality, and the seizure of homelands by invading governments. But the story of these last five centuries is not entirely a story of destruction. It is also about how Native people intentionally and strategically kept their cultures alive.

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
13.2383
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Chiricahua Apache Gutálsi'á' (hide painting) representing the Na'ii'es, or puberty ceremony, made by Naiche, ca. 1900

Date:
1900
Creator:
Naiche

This hide painting, painted by the Apache chief Naiche, depicts an Apache puberty ceremony, called 'Na'ii'es.'

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
13.2383
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Strawberry And Chocolate

Date:
2000
Creator:
Gail Tremblay

This sculpture, molded by Gail Tremblay of the Onondaga and Mi'kmaq tribes, conveys a sense of identity as part of the Our Lives collection. The main section of Our Lives centers on various layers of identity. For Native people, identity--who you are, how you dress, what you think, where you fit in, and how you see yourself in the world--has been shaped by language, place, community membership, social and political consciousness, and customs and beliefs. But Native identity has also been influenced by a legacy of legal policies that have sought to determine who is Indian and who is not. The issue of Native identity continues to resonate today, as Native people across the Americas seek to claim the future on their own terms.

Description (physical):

H: 229cm.

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
25.7273
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian