KERR Revolver

Date:
1861-1865
Creator:
London Armory Co.
Description (physical):

H: 6 1/2 W: 11" D: 1 1/2"

Location:
500 S Bronough St,Florida,Tallahassee,32399
Identifier:
H-332
Institution:
Museum of Florida History
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Navy Civil War Issue Starr Revolver

Date:
ca. 1858-1860
Creator:
Starr Arms Company
Description (physical):

12" x 6"

Location:
500 S Bronough St,Florida,Tallahassee,32399
Identifier:
94979
Institution:
Museum of Florida History
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Model 1860 COLT 44 Revolver

Date:
1863
Creator:
Colt
Description (physical):

H:1 5/8" W" 13 1/2" D: 5 1/2"

Location:
500 S Bronough St,Florida,Tallahassee,32399
Identifier:
85.041.001
Institution:
Museum of Florida History
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Model 1851 COLT Revolver

Date:
1857
Creator:
Colt, Samuel
Description (physical):

H: 5" L: 13" D: 1 1/2"

Location:
500 S Bronough St,Florida,Tallahassee,32399
Identifier:
18420
Institution:
Museum of Florida History
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Navy Colt Revolver, Model 1851

Date:
1851
Creator:
Samuel Colt, Hartford, Connecticut
Description (physical):

Iron/steel, brass, walnut. Length - 13" (33.0cm); Barrel length - 7 1/2" (19.0cm); Approx. 36 caliber

Location:
1 Old Sturbridge Village Road,Massachusetts,Sturbridge,01566
Identifier:
49.1.142a-b
Institution:
Old Sturbridge Village
credits:
Collection of Old Sturbridge Village
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Lefaucheaux Revolver

Date:
c. 1863
Location:
1195 Baltimore Pike,Pennsylvania,Gettysburg,17325
Identifier:
2010.0124.0113
Institution:
Gettysburg National Military Park

Jeb Stuart’s Pistol

This English-made, cased Tranter revolver was given to Confederate Major General James Ewell Brown “Jeb” Stuart by Heros von Borcke. Von Borcke was a Prussian officer who took leave from his country’s services to serve in the American Civil War. He served as Stuart’s chief of staff, with the rank of major, until he was seriously wounded at Middleburg, Virginia, in June 1863. That same month, von Borcke gave this revolver to Stuart, in the expectation that Stuart would have attained the rank of lieutenant general. Stuart had hopes of receiving this rank after commanding “Stonewall” Jackson’s corps when that officer was mortally wounded during the battle of Chancellorsville. Unfortunately he never obtained that rank, but the inscription on the cover of the cased revolver states: “LT. GEN J.E.B. STUART C.S.A. CULPEPPER, VA JUNE 1863/ FROM HEROS VON BORCKE.”

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.027
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Lemat Revolver

This .42 caliber LeMat revolver has a nine-chambered cylinder and weighs about four pounds. What makes this revolver unique is the addition of a second smoothbore barrel, of approximately .63 caliber, underneath the barrel. This larger barrel was designed to fire buckshot. The top of the hammer was fitted with a pivoting striker that could be rotated to fire the .42 caliber rounds or changed to fire the lower, larger barrel. This percussion revolver was designed by Dr. Jean Alexandre Francois LeMat, of New Orleans. LeMat was assisted in this enterprise by P. G. T. Beauregard, one of the Confederacy’s well known generals. These revolvers were manufactured from 1856 to 1865, with less than 2,900 being produced. They were made in Paris, France, and Birmingham, England. Many were purchased by the Confederacy and used by such famous high-ranking Confederate officers as J. E. B. Stuart.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.015
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

J. H. Dance And Brothers Revolver

Creator:
J. H. Dance and Brothers

This rare six-shot Confederate revolver was made in .36 and .44 calibers. Soon after the Civil War began, the Confederate government and individual states issued a call for firearms. As a result, a large variety of firearms—from flintlock rifles, pistols, and shotguns to current weaponry seized from federal properties—was used by Confederate soldiers at the beginning of the conflict. It became expedient for the South to begin manufacturing guns to keep their troops armed. Those organizations that did begin manufacturing arms largely used United States weapons as models, though this model is distinguishable by the lack of recoil shield protrusions on the frame. J. H. Dance and Brothers of Columbia, Texas, modeled their revolvers after the Colt Dragoon. The firm started manufacturing firearms in 1862. The men who worked for this company were granted exemption from military service by the state because the need for firearms was so great. In 1863 the workshop was moved farther inland due to fear that the Union gunboats would shell it, but operations apparently ceased following the move. Approximately 325 to 500 revolvers were manufactured by this firm.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.014
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Colt Model 1861 Navy Revolver

The .36 caliber Colt Model 1861 Navy revolver was manufactured from 1861 through circa 1873. This model is designed much like the Colt Model 1860 but is somewhat smaller due to its smaller caliber. It is uncertain how many were purchased for the U.S. Navy during the war.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.013
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History