The Naval War Of 1812

Date:
1995
Creator:
William S. Dudley (editor)
Publisher/Studio:
Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office

Documentary overview of the naval aspects of the War of 1812.

Description (physical):

Hardback

Location:
301 East Pratt Street Baltimore, Maryland 21201
Identifier:
E360.N35 Vol. II, LCCN: 85-600565
Institution:
USS Constellation Museum

Commanders Of The Civil War

Date:
1990
Creator:
Davis, William C.
Publisher/Studio:
New York, NY: Salmander Books, Ltd.
Description (physical):

Hardback, 256 pp with index, 10" x 13"

Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

Les Paul Log

Date:
1940
Creator:
Les Paul

During the 1930s, inventive individuals experimented with guitar bodies made from a solid piece of wood rather than soundboards over a hollow chamber—partly for ease of fabrication, partly to prevent feedback. One of the most prominent innovators was Les Paul. He made this guitar by taking a 4x4-inch solid block of pine, fitting it with two homemade electronic pickups, and then gluing on the halves of a hollow-body guitar to make it look slightly more conventional. Around 1946, Paul took his "log" idea to Gibson. Although the company did not use his design as a prototype, it did work with him and use his name to promote its first line of solid-body guitars in the 1950s.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.017
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Gibson Eh-100

Date:
1937
Publisher/Studio:
Kalamazoo, MI: Gibson Inc.

The Hawaiian, or steel, guitar was prominent in American music by the 1920s. Therefore, it is not surprising that most early commercial sales in electric guitars were for this popular style. Introduced in 1936, the EH-100 was one of Gibson's first entries in the electric guitar market. That year's model had only one control knob and a black finish. In 1937 the model was upgraded to have two control knobs and a sunburst finish, like this instrument.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.016
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Gibson Es-150

Date:
1937
Publisher/Studio:
Kalamazoo, MI: Gibson Inc.

Introduced in 1936, this was the first Spanish-style electric guitar to achieve commercial significance, thanks in part to Charlie Christian, an inventive jazz soloist who gained prominence with the Benny Goodman Sextet. Christian took what had been considered a novelty and brought it to the forefront as a lead instrument. Gibson's first electric Spanish guitar, the ES-150's design featured a one-piece steel bar surrounded by the pickup coil and two magnets below the strings, rather than the earlier horseshoe configuration with magnets directly surrounding the strings. This new pickup was nicknamed the "Christian" in honor of the great guitarist with whom it is associated.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.015
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Rickenbacker Electro Spanish (model B)

Date:
1936
Publisher/Studio:
Los Angeles, CA: Electro String Instrument Corporation

Introduced in 1935, this model was a precursor to solid-body Spanish-style electric guitars. Though parts of it are hollow, that is solely in the interest of reducing weight. In design, the Electro Spanish functions as a solid-body guitar, virtually eliminating the acoustic feedback that plagued early hollow-body electrics. Made of Bakelite, the first synthetic plastic, it has stainless-steel cavity covers, a detachable neck, and a horseshoe pickup. It also came in a Hawaiian version, which was much more popular.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.014
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Gibson Super 400 Electric

Date:
1931
Publisher/Studio:
Los Angeles, CA: Electro String Instrument Corporation

This Gibson Super 400 was designed for 1930s guitarist Muzzy Marcellino, who asked Gibson to make him a larger, more powerful instrument. The success of this model over smaller-body guitars led other manufacturers to develop their own large-body archtops. The pick guard, with mounted electric pickups, was probably added to the instrument in the late 1940s. Acoustic or electric, the Gibson Super 400 produced a loud sound that could compete with the brass instruments in a big band.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.013
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Rickenbacker Electro Hawaiian, The Frying Pan

Date:
1931
Publisher/Studio:
Los Angeles, CA: Electro String Instrument Corporation

Crafted from a single piece of wood, this lap-steel guitar was the prototype for a cast-aluminum model nicknamed the Frying Pan. The first commercially successful electric guitar, its electromagnetic pickup is essentially the technology used on all electric guitars today. Working for Adolph Rickenbacker, George Beauchamp filed his first U.S. patent application for the Frying Pan in 1932, shortly before the guitar went into commercial production. A second, greatly revised application was submitted in 1934. Although the Frying Pan was already on the market, two successive patent examiners questioned whether the instrument was "operative."To prove that it was, Adolph Rickenbacker sent several guitarists to perform for the examiners at the Patent Office in Washington, D.C. After many such delays, the patent was finally granted in 1937. By that time, though, other inventors had developed and marketed electric guitars of their own.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.012
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Gibson L-5 Electric

Date:
1929
Publisher/Studio:
Kalamazoo, MI: Gibson Inc.

Musician Lloyd Loar was an exceptional acoustic engineer at the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Manufacturing Company from 1919 to 1924. He designed improvements as well as new models of Gibson instruments, from the F-5 mandolin to the L-5 guitar. The L-5 was Gibson's first archtop guitar with f-holes instead of the round sound hole, and was played by jazz and country musicians including Eddie Lang and Maybelle Carter. As early as 1923 Loar developed an electrostatic pickup system for amplifying instruments. This early experimental electric guitar is equipped with an electrostatic pickup mounted beneath the bridge and with an output jack concealed in the tailpiece.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.011
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

D'Aquisto Advance Archtop

Date:
1995
Creator:
James D'Aquisto
Publisher/Studio:
Greenport, NY

Innovation and experimentation in the shapes and sounds of guitars continue today. James D'Aquisto began working in John D'Angelico's shop in the 1950s and, after D'Angelico's death in 1964, continued the tradition of building high-quality archtop guitars. Over time D'Aquisto experimented with design changes, and his own signature style began to evolve. In 1995, D'Aquisto crafted experimental sound holes with removable baffles to control the volume ranges of this blue archtop guitar.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.01
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History