The Signal Corps, U.s.a., In The War Of The Rebellion

Date:
1896
Creator:
Brown, J. Williard
Publisher/Studio:
Boston, MA: Veteran Signal Corps Association
Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

Deeds Of Valor From Records In The Archives Of The Untied States Government

Date:
1907
Creator:
Beyer, W. F.
Publisher/Studio:
Detroit, MI: The Perrien-Keydel Company
Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

For Courageous Fighting And Confident Dying

Date:
1998
Creator:
Armstrong, Warren B.
Publisher/Studio:
Lawrence, Kansas: University Press of Kansas
Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

Fender Stratocaster

Date:
1954
Publisher/Studio:
Fullerton, CA: Fender Electric Instrument Company

The Stratocaster is arguably the most successful and influential electric guitar ever produced. It is easily identified by its double cutaways, contoured body, and three pickups. It also features Fender's vibrato or tremolo system that allows players to raise or lower the pitch of the strings. In the hands of Buddy Holly, Jimi Hendrix, Buddy Guy, Eric Clapton, Bonnie Raitt, and many others, the "Strat" has become an American icon. Bearing serial number 0100, this particular instrument was probably the first Strat to be shipped for retail sale. It features the standard two-tone sunburst finish used on early Fender models.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.024
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Bigsby Double Neck

Date:
1952
Creator:
Paul Bigsby
Publisher/Studio:
Downey, CA

This Paul Bigsby guitar, custom-made for country singer Grady Martin, has a standard six-string neck coupled with a five-string mandolin neck. Bigsby, a pattern maker and motorcyclist from California, is best known for making one of the first solid-body electric guitars—for country star Merle Travis—and later for his popular line of pedal-steel guitars. Country musicians were avid players of electric guitars from the earliest days of their manufacture.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.023
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Gibson Les Paul Gold Top

Date:
1952
Publisher/Studio:
Kalamazoo, MI: Gibson Inc.

The Les Paul model was Gibson's first entry into the solid-body electric guitar market, developed in response to the success of Fender's Broadcaster/Telecaster model. Primarily designed by Gibson president Ted McCarty, guitarist and innovator Les Paul's input included the "rich-looking" gold finish and the original combination bridge-tailpiece. In many variations, the Les Paul model has been the mainstay in the Gibson catalog since its introduction in 1952. Paul's close association with Gibson helped make its line tremendously popular.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.022
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Fender Broadcaster With Amplifier

Date:
1950
Publisher/Studio:
Fullerton, CA: Fender Electric Instrument Company

The Broadcaster, Fender's first mass-produced solid-body electric guitar, initially was derided by competitors as too simple and lacking in craftsmanship. Yet everything about its patented practical design, such as the bolt-on neck, was optimal for production in large quantities. This guitar, serial number 27, was one of the first Broadcasters sold. In 1951, due to a trademark infringement claim, the model's name was changed to Telecaster in honor of another popular invention—television. The many famous artists who have played the Telecaster, such as Jimmy Bryant, Buck Owens, Keith Richards, and Bruce Springsteen, propelled it to the status of a classic.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.021
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Slingerland Songster

Date:
1939
Publisher/Studio:
Chicago, IL: Slingerland Musical Instrument Manufacturing Co.

The Slingerland company, best known as a drum manufacturer, also made guitars and banjos. This rare Slingerland Songster electric guitar, featured in a 1939 company catalog, pre-dates Les Paul's "Log" guitar and is probably the earliest Spanish-style solid-body electric guitar model. The guitar's pickup includes individual string magnets as well as a large horseshoe magnet. Slingerland ceased making electric instruments in 1940 in order to exclusively focus on producing percussion instruments.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.02
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

"big Boy" Acoustic

Date:
1930
Creator:
Carl Larson, August Larson
Publisher/Studio:
Prarie State Conservatory

The Larson brothers' guitars, built under several different brand names, were among the first to be specifically designed for steel strings. To compensate for the extra tension on the guitars, the Larsons patented a double-rod truss system in which one rod supported the main body and one rod supported the guitar's neck. This unusually big Prairie State-brand acoustic is among the largest flattop guitars ever made. Simply by virtue of its size, the "Big Boy" was intended to produce a loud sound.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.005
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

National Hawaiian Tricone

Date:
1929
Publisher/Studio:
Los Angeles, CA

The resonator guitar was developed around 1925 by John Dopyera. Its amplification resonator, mounted under the bridge, was a concept adapted from the banjo. A variety of these guitars with metal bodies was produced by the National String Instrument Corporation, co-founded by Dopyera. The instruments were popular in country, blues, and especially Hawaiian music. Introduced in 1927, this lap-steel model features three aluminum speaker-shaped cones built into the top. Unlike earlier acoustics, this guitar's sound is created by the vibrations of the resonator cones, not of the body itself. Sol Hoopii, the best-known Hawaiian guitarist at the time, helped make this model briefly popular until the advent of the louder electric guitar.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.004
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History