Restraining Device

Restraining devices in the form of leg irons are common on ships of the eighteenth century as a means to deal with unruly sailors. Two examples of leg irons, also called shackles or bilboes, have been recovered from the QAR site so far. One shackle was identified via X-radiography and still remains in concretion. The second has been cleaned and exhibits cord wrapping in a manner as those recovered from the wrecked slave ship Henrietta Marie. The wrapping may have helped protect the legs of the ship's enslaved human cargo.

Identifier:
QAR366.079
Institution:
Queen Anne's Revenge

Surveying Sight

A brass sight for a surveying device was found 3 ft. from the pivotal mount, and the two pieces may have came from the same instrument. The sight (height 6 in.) is slotted twice for rough and pinpoint aiming, and the larger slot (1.8 x 0.4in.) is bracketed by two holes that would have held a crosshair. A setscrew attaches the sight to an index that is broken at a threaded fastener hole. When intact, the index would have held a second sight with opposing slots.

Description (physical):

Material: Brass. H: 6".

Identifier:
QAR307.000
Institution:
Queen Anne's Revenge

Whetstone

A rectangular sandstone whetstone (4.2 x 1.5 x 0.6 inch) exhibits considerable usage patterns along the edges. This artifact may have been used to sharpen cutlasses, knives, boarding axes, or other edged weapons and tools.

Description (physical):

Material: Sandstone. L: 4.2", W: 1.5", H: 0.6".

Identifier:
QAR327.001
Institution:
Queen Anne's Revenge

Gunner's Bar

A brass bar with logarithmic scales on three of its four faces features decorative finials on either end. This lone representative has been identified as gunner's bar or tally stick that would have been used to calculate shot and bore diameters.

Identifier:
QAR309.001
Institution:
Queen Anne's Revenge

Side Plate

A brass side plate, fashioned in a serpent motif was recovered from the concretion containing Cannon 4. "Serpent sideplates" are well documented in the archaeological record and were common on firearms throughout the 18th century.

Identifier:
QAR366.010
Institution:
Queen Anne's Revenge

Gun Lock

Date:
C. Early 1700s

The lock is a true flintlock, with no dog latch and is set on the half cock position. Locks of this type can be easily distinguished from the earlier dog locks by the shape of the tumbler that incorporated a reliable half cock, thus eliminating the need for the dog latch. Though the French possibly invented true flintlocks in the middle 17th century, dock locks were being used by the English military in the first decades of the 18th century.

Identifier:
QAR326.000
Institution:
Queen Anne's Revenge

Gun Barrel

This is an example of an English gun barrel or musketoon barrel of a style typically found aboard ships during the latter half of the 17th century, and throughout the 18th century. Though commonly referred to as a blunderbuss, the English Board of Ordnance distinguished flaring muzzle shotguns with barrels less than 20-inches in length as gun barrels, and those over 20-inches as musketoons. With a length of 27-inches, this example clearly falls into the latter category. The letter V beneath a crown indicates that the weapon had been "viewed" and approved for testing. Read more »

Identifier:
QAR009.001
Institution:
Queen Anne's Revenge

Hand Grenades

Date:
C. Early 1700s

Two hand grenades were found attached to a pewter platter recovered in 1998. The grenades are cast iron spheres packed with gunpowder and pierced to accept a hollow wooden fuse. The fuse also contained powder and a paper match, and was lit and thrown at the enemy with devastating results. Occasionally the fuse was too long, giving the intended victims the opportunity to return the grenade to the pirates. Identical examples were recovered from the pirate ship Whydah Galley, lost off Cape Cod in 1717.

Identifier:
QAR350.004-.005
Institution:
Queen Anne's Revenge

Bar Shot

Bar-type shot are represented in the cannon ammunition assemblage. These contrivances consisted of two parts connected by an iron bar. They were used at close range to slash through the rigging and sails of an enemy ship.

Identifier:
QAR011.00
Institution:
Queen Anne's Revenge

Wadding

Date:
C. Early 1700s

Of the cannons that have been cleaned, four were loaded and each contained waddage used to pack their respective cannon loads. Since most cannons recovered from shipwrecks are not loaded, these cannon and their contents contain important information concerning naval artillery practices from the early 18th century. The variation of the fiber types used to make waddage indicates that sailors used what ever pieces of old ropes were available. The cordage scraps, generally made of hemp, were picked apart and combined to form the wads for any one of the cannon.

Identifier:
QAR418.015
Institution:
Queen Anne's Revenge