Brass Kettle Piece

This brass kettle piece was used by the Odawa or Ottawa, a Canadian tribe, who were allied to the French. Some of members of the tribe participated in the attack on the British forces under Lt. Col. Washington at Fort Necessity.

Recently, they loaned artifacts now on exhibit at Fort Necessity National Battlefield such as this one.

Potogan Made by the Odawa Indians

Potogans, such as this modern reproduction made from white birch, were used by the Odawa and other Native American tribes to grind corn.

The Odawa or Ottawa, a Canadian tribe, were allied to the French. Some of members of the tribe participated in the attack on the British forces under Lt. Col. Washington at Fort Necessity.

Recently, they loaned artifacts now on exhibit at Fort Necessity National Battlefield.

Swivel Shot Found at Fort Necessity

The British forces carried several swivel guns overland on their march from Alexandria, Virginia to Fort Necessity. Swivel guns were small cannon that could be quickly manueuvered by hand and used to fire grape shot or other large balls at approaching troops.

Brass Surveyor's Compass

Lt. Col. George Washington undoubtedly would have had surveying equipment such as this compass with him, since a major goal of the expedition was the creation of a road from Fort Cumberland towards French-held Fort Duquesne (now Pittsburgh.)

Washington's first survey exercise dates to 1747, which he was 16. The following year he accompanied George William Fairfax and James Genn, Surveyor of Prince William County, on a month-long trip west across the Blue Ridge Mountains to survey land for Thomas, Lord Fairfax.

Folding Knife

A folding knife was one of the items found during the excavations at the Great Meadows, near Fort Necessity.

Head of a Mattock

Date:
1750s

This mattock head found near Fort Necessity was likely used to dig postholes or loosen dirt for the earthen defenses.

British Pistol

Date:
1740s

British officers at Fort Necessity would likely have used pistols similar to this one dating from the 1740s.

British Broad Axe

This head of a British broad axe was excavated near Fort Necessity.

British Officer's Gorget

Date:
1750s

British officers wore gorgets such as this one under their chins for protection. This reproduction is on display at Fort Necessity National Battlefield.

Original Stockade Post from Fort Necessity

Victorious French troops burned the stockade after Col. Washington surrendered. Almost 200 years later, archaeologist J.C. Harrington recovered the undergrond portion of this white oak post which survived the blaze. View other posts.