Lincoln's Top Hat

Date:
1860s
Publisher/Studio:
Transfer from the War Department with permission from Mary Lincoln, 1867

At six feet four inches tall, Lincoln towered over most of his contemporaries. He chose to stand out even more by wearing high top hats. He acquired this hat from J. Y. Davis, a Washington hat maker. Lincoln had the black silk mourning band added in remembrance of his son Willie. No one knows when he obtained the hat, or how often he wore it. The last time he put it on was to go to Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865. After Lincoln’s assassination, the War Department preserved his hat and other material left at Ford’s Theatre.

Location:
National Museum of American History, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20013-7012
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Map Of First Scheduled Passenger Air Route From St. Petersburg To Tampa Bay, Florida.

This map shows the path of the St. Petersburg-Tampa Airboat Line, which began flying across Tampa Bay on January 1, 1914. The flight covered 29 kilometers (18 miles) and took 23 minutes-11 hours less than traveling between St. Petersburg and Tampa by rail. Nevertheless, it lasted only three months.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
S.101.p2c-P_640
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Calder DC-8

In the early 1970s, to promote travel to South America, Braniff Airlines hired American artist Alexander Calder to create a flying work of art.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
NASM-9A0276
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Emily Howell

Emily Howell broke through the gender barrier to become the first American woman to fly routinely for a scheduled U.S. commercial airline. An experienced pilot when regional carrier Frontier Airlines hired her as a second officer in 1973, Howell soon advanced to first officer (co-pilot) and then to captain.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
NASM-92-16871
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Supercritical Wing

A supercritical wing delays the formation and reduces the size of shock waves over the wing at transonic speeds (just below and above the speed of sound), the speeds at which most jetliners fly. All new large jetliners now feature this highly efficient, drag-reducing wing design.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.003
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Winglet Flight Testing

This is an image of Winglets-small vertical fins on wingtips-reduce the strength of wingtip vortices (air swirling off the ends of the wings). Most airliners feature some type of winglet to help decrease drag.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.004
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Airbus A320 Glass Cockpit Display

The exhibition features this cockpit diplay with a computer-simulated takeoff and landing of an Airbus A320 from Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.
The A320 was the first airliner equipped with a glass cockpit and digital fly-by-wire flight controls, which provide more information to the pilot while enhancing safety and efficiency. Pioneered by NASA and the aerospace industry, the glass cockpit was introduced in 1982 and is now the industry standard.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.005
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Racing To The Moon Exhibit

Date:
1969
Creator:
Neil Armstrong, (1930-)

Neil Armstrong took this picture of Buzz Aldrin on the Moon during the Apollo 11 mission. As the first human setting foot on the moon, Armstrong remarked,"That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind."

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
69-HC-684
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Military Origins Of The Space Race

This image shows American rockets, built after World War II and used both for military and civilian endeavors. After World War II, the rocket foreshadowed a new style of warfare in which nuclear bombs could be delivered quickly across the world. War might begin--and end--suddenly, decisively, without warning. As the Space Race began, the United States and the Soviet Union were building rockets to use as long-range weapons. The United States initially favored bombers, but the Soviets preferred missiles and thus took an early lead in rocket technology.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
2004-60151
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

1903 Wright Flyer

Date:
1903
Creator:
Wilbur Wright, (1867-1912), Orville Wright, (1871-1948)

The Wright brothers inaugurated the aerial age with the world's first successful flights of a powered heavier-than-air flying machine. The Wright Flyer was the product of a sophisticated four-year program of research and development conducted by Wilbur and Orville Wright beginning in 1899. After building and testing three full-sized gliders, the Wrights' first powered airplane flew at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, on December 17, 1903, making a 12-second flight, traveling 36 m (120 ft), with Orville piloting. The best flight of the day, with Wilbur at the controls, covered 255.6 m (852 ft) in 59 seconds.

Description (physical):

H: 2.8m, W: 12.3m, L: 6.4m, Wt.: 605lbs. Canard biplane with one 12-horsepower Wright horizontal four-cylinder engine driving two pusher propellers via sprocket-and-chain transmission system. No wheels; skids for landing gear. Natural fabric finish; no sealant or paint of any kind. Material: Wood Fabric, Aluminum

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
A19610048000
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum