Boeing F4B-4

Date:
1933
Publisher/Studio:
Boeing Aircraft Co.

The Boeing F4B/P-12 series served as the primary fighter of the U.S. Navy and U.S. Army Air Corps in the early 1930s, and it remained in service in numerous roles until the early 1940s. It was the last wooden-winged, biplane fighter produced by Boeing and used by the U.S. military. The large quantity of F4B/P-12s built and purchased helped to establish Boeing as an important aircraft manufacturer and to sustain the firm through the economic hardships of the Great Depression. Total production of the F4B/P-12 series reached 586. Read more »

Description (physical):

H: 2.9m, W: 9.2m, L: 6.2m, Wt: 2354lbs.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington, District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
A19610200000CP09
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Cessna O-1A Bird Dog

Date:
1950
Publisher/Studio:
Wichita, KS: Cessna Aircraft Company, Inc.

In the Korean War the Bird Dog, affectionately called "the jeep with wings," was used for a variety of missions including artillery spotting, laying communication wire, evacuating wounded and dropping supplies and flares. Then designated the L-19, it was frequently used as an observation platform for field commanders. In September 1962, the Bird Dog was re-designated as the O-1A-the first all metal, high-wing, single-engine aircraft to see service in U.S. Army aviation. During the War in Southeast Asia, the U.S.

Description (physical):

H: 2.28m, W: 10.9m, L: 7.6m, Wt: 1400lbs., Top speed: 208km/hr.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
19780403000a
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum
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Douglas D-558-2

Publisher/Studio:
Douglas Aircraft Co.

Piloted by A. Scott Crossfield, on November 20, 1953, the Douglas D-558-2 Skyrocket became the first aircraft to fly faster than Mach 2, twice the speed of sound. Air-launched from a U.S. Navy Boeing P2B-1S (B-29) the swept-wing, rocket-powered D-558-2 reached Mach 2.005 in a shallow dive at 18,898 meters (62,000 feet).

The D-558 series of aircraft was developed by Douglas under the direction of Edward H. Heinemann for the U.S. Navy to explore transonic and supersonic flight. The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA, the predecessor to NASA), used this Skyrocket, the second one built, to explore the flight characteristics of swept-wing aircraft. It set several other speed and altitude records before the program ended in 1956.

Description (physical):

White, US Navy, single-seat, rocket-powered supersonic aircraft. Material: Aluminum. H: 3.9m, W: 7.6m, L: 12.8m, Wt: 9421lbs., Top Speed: 2078km/hr.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
A19610108000CP11
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Boeing 747

This is a photograph of the Boeing 747. Designed originally for Pan American to replace the 707, the giant Boeing 747 revolutionized long-distance air travel when it entered service in 1970.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.002
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Boeing 707

A Boeing 707, such as this aircraft, was designed for transcontinen¬tal or one-stop transatlantic range. But modified with extra fuel tanks and more efficient turbofan engines, 707-300s could fly nonstop across the Atlantic. Boeing built 855 707s.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
NASM-95-9043
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Opening St. Petersburg-tampa Air Boat Line

Date:
1914

This photograph shows the first commercial flight over Tampa Bay in the air boat Benoist XIV. Former St. Petersburg Mayor A. C. Phiel (center) paid $400 for the honor of being the first passenger on the St. Petersburg-Tampa Airboat Line. Pilot Tony Jannus is on the right; the airline's organizer, Paul E. Fansler, on the left.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
2000-6126
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Benoist Airboat Over Tampa Bay

Date:
1914

This photograph shows the Benoist flying over Tampa Bay. For its St. Petersburg-Tampa Airboat Line, St. Petersburg purchased this Model XIV from St. Louis aircraft manufacturer Thomas Benoist. The airplane could carry one passenger, who sat next to the pilot in the open cockpit. The Benoist was powered by a Roberts 75-horsepower, 6-cylinder, water-cooled engine.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
SI-00133278
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Earl Ovington-first Mail Carrier

Date:
Sept13, 1911.

This photograph depicts Earle Ovington inside his airplane. While Ovington's flight was purely ceremonial, it marked the first time an airplane officially carried the mail.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
87-7708
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Earle Ovington

This image shows Earle Ovington, who flew the first flight for the U.S. Postal Service on September 13, 1911 from Long Island, New York. With a full mail bag squeezed between his legs, Ovington took off and flew to Mineola, a few miles away. He banked his airplane and pushed the bag overboard. It fell to the ground and was retrieved by the local postmaster.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
7B05364
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Queen Bleriot

Date:
1911

This image shows the Queen airplane that Earle Ovington flew on his brief air mail flight in 1911. The Queen was based on the popular Blériot monoplane design.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
73-2252
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum