Prince's Yellow Cloud

Date:
1989
Creator:
David Rusan, Barry Haugen
Publisher/Studio:
Minneapolis, MN: Knut-Koupee Enterprises, Inc.

This guitar was designed by Prince for his exclusive use and was custom-made by Minneapolis craftsmen. The musician's distinctive personal symbol adorns both the top and the side of the fingerboard. Today, custom work for famous instrumentalists provides an important marketing tool for small-scale guitar makers. Solid-body construction enables the creation of highly imaginative shapes. Colors like this bright yellow were first offered commercially by Fender in the mid-1950s.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
10.041
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Gretsch 6120 Chet Atkins

Date:
1959
Publisher/Studio:
Brooklyn, NY: Fred Gretsch Manufacturing Company

Introduced in 1955, the 6120 was co-designed by, and made for, Chet Atkins to feature his signature style of fingerpicking. The model was also popularized by Eddie Cochran and Duane Eddy. Like other Gretsch guitar models, the 6120 changed constantly; by 1959 the Bigsby vibrato was added as a standard feature. This hollow-body electric guitar was Atkins's personal instrument and appeared on the 1961 Chet Atkins' Workshop album cover.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
10.03
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Gibson Les Paul Standard, Or Sunburst

Date:
1959
Publisher/Studio:
Kalamazoo, MI: Gibson Inc.

After its introduction in 1952, Gibson's Les Paul model went through a variety of modifications that culminated in the classic Standard, or Sunburst, in 1958. Its maple cap on a solid mahogany body and the newly perfected twin-coil humbucking pickups produce a sound that is highly suitable for rock music. Famous players like Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, and Duane Allman helped this guitar become one of the most popular ever. Les Paul Standards dating from 1958-1960 are among the most sought-after guitars on the vintage market.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
10.029
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Fender Mary Kaye Stratocaster

Date:
1959
Publisher/Studio:
Fullerton, CA: Fender Electric Instrument Company

The combination of gold hardware and custom translucent beige finish on this rare example first appeared on a guitar belonging to Las Vegas-based trio leader Mary Kaye. Shown in a 1956 Fender promotional ad featuring her group, this design earned the nickname "The Mary Kaye Strat." Associating well-known musical artists with their electric guitars was a highly effective marketing tool for guitar companies. Admiring enthusiasts were influenced to purchase the same instrument model as their favorite performer.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
10.028
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Lockheed Martin/boeing Rq-3a Darkstar

Date:
1996

Lockheed Martin, Boeing, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) developed the stealthy, low-observable DarkStar to provide sustained reconnaissance information from anywhere within enemy territory, day or night, in all types of weather. Developed concurrently with the nonstealthy RQ-4A Global Hawk, DarkStar could provide near real-time target data and imagery by way of satellite links to its mobile ground station. The first DarkStar prototype flew successfully in March 1996 but crashed during its second flight a month later. More than two years passed before a second prototype took to the air and performed an autonomous takeoff, flight plan, and landing. It made five flights before the program was canceled in January 1999. The DarkStar displayed here was built before the program ended but never performed a flight test. When the Museum acquired it, the inlet and the exhaust had been sealed due to the classified nature of the design.

Description (physical):

This is a high altitude, strategic reconnaissance platform designed with a "stealthy" radar signature. Perhaps the strangest UAV in the collection resembling a flying saucer with long, narrow wings. Overall: 3.5' x 1' x 15' x 69'.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
DarkStar 104
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Sikorsky UH-34D Seahorse

Date:
Silorsky Aircraft

Beginning in 1962, the H-34 served as the primary Marine Corps assault helicopter of the Vietnam War until its replacement by the turbine-powered CH-46. It began in 1952 as a Navy anti-submarine warfare helicopter evolved from the Sikorsky S-55 series. Initially designated as the HSS-1, it would also go on to see significant service in the combat assault and utility roles with the Army and Marine Corps. Great Britain and France also deployed versions in some of the first helicopter combat assault operations. Read more »

Description (physical):

All equipment that came with the helicopter that is not attached to it is contained in box A19750823002 with the exception of two items. The VIP steps that attach to the side of the aircraft and the long-handled tool to assist with main rotor blade deployment are stored inside the helicopter's cabin. H: 16', W: 15', L: 47', Wt: 7560lbs.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington, District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
A19750823000cp12
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

In The Garden (corns, Beans, And Squash)

Date:
2003
Creator:
Marie Watt

This piece, which forms a part of the National Museum of the American Indian's young but vital collection of contemporary art, speaks to the concerns and experiences of Native people today. It addresses memory, history, the significance of place for Native communities, and the continuing relevance of cultural traditions.

Description (physical):

Material: Reclaimed wool blankets, Satin Bindings, Thread.

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
26.5807
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Jimi Hendrix's Patchwork Leather Coat

This panel and object exhibition highlights Native people who have been active participants in contemporary music for nearly a century. Musicians like Russell "Big Chief" Moore (Gila River Indian Community), Rita Coolidge (Cherokee), Buffy Sainte-Marie (Cree), and the group Redbone are a few of the Native performing artists who have had successful careers in popular music. Many have been involved in various forms of popular music--from jazz and blues to folk, country, and rock. Read more »

Description (physical):

Material: Leather

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.002
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Nanticoke Schoolboys Playing "bear In Ring," Delaware, Ca. 1911

Date:
1911
Creator:
Frank G. Speck

This photograph shows Nanticoke school boys playing a game in a Delaware schoolyard. The boy facing the camera is Roosevelt Perkins.

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
N01304
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Blackfeet woman's beaded dress, ca. 1890

Date:
1890

This dress, made by the Blackfeet tribe, represents the Our Peoples collection. The collection details the interactions between American Indians and Europeans over the last 500 years. In the struggle for survival, nearly every Native community wrestled with the impact of deadly new diseases and weaponry, the weakening of traditional spirituality, and the seizure of homelands by invading governments. But the story of these last five centuries is not entirely a story of destruction. It is also about how Native people intentionally and strategically kept their cultures alive.

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
13.2383
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian