Colt Model 1860 Army Revolver

This Colt Model 1860 Army revolver was manufactured from 1860 through 1873 with a total production of more than 200,000. It was a six-shot, .44 caliber revolver and the primary handgun used by Union troops during the Civil War because of its reliability.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.011
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Remington New Model Army Revolver

Creator:
E. Remington & Sons

E. Remington & Sons of Ilion, New York, made this New Model Army revolver from 1863 to 1875. Approximately 132,000 were manufactured. This six-shot, .44 caliber revolver was the second most issued pistol to Union soldiers during the Civil War.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.012
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Colt Model 1861 Navy Revolver

The .36 caliber Colt Model 1861 Navy revolver was manufactured from 1861 through circa 1873. This model is designed much like the Colt Model 1860 but is somewhat smaller due to its smaller caliber. It is uncertain how many were purchased for the U.S. Navy during the war.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.013
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

General Orders From J.E.B. Stuart

Date:
Mar 12, 1863

These general orders from J. E. B. Stuart, dated March 12, 1863, praise Captain John Singleton Mosby for his skill and daring, in particular the capture of Brigadier General Edwin H. Stoughton and thirty of his men in Fairfax, Virginia, in the early morning hours of March 8, 1863. The Union forces stationed a few miles away were unaware that Mosby and his men were in the vicinity; Stoughton, who’s quarters were miles from his soldiers’s, proved an easy target. He was awakened from his slumber by Mosby and informed that he was now a prisoner of Mosby’s Rangers.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington, District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.035
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Mosby's jacket

This cavalry jacket was worn by John Mosby during the war.

Location:
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th Sts. NW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.036
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Rickenbacker Electro Hawaiian, The Frying Pan

Date:
1931
Publisher/Studio:
Los Angeles, CA: Electro String Instrument Corporation

Crafted from a single piece of wood, this lap-steel guitar was the prototype for a cast-aluminum model nicknamed the Frying Pan. The first commercially successful electric guitar, its electromagnetic pickup is essentially the technology used on all electric guitars today. Working for Adolph Rickenbacker, George Beauchamp filed his first U.S. patent application for the Frying Pan in 1932, shortly before the guitar went into commercial production. A second, greatly revised application was submitted in 1934. Although the Frying Pan was already on the market, two successive patent examiners questioned whether the instrument was "operative."To prove that it was, Adolph Rickenbacker sent several guitarists to perform for the examiners at the Patent Office in Washington, D.C. After many such delays, the patent was finally granted in 1937. By that time, though, other inventors had developed and marketed electric guitars of their own.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.012
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Gibson Super 400 Electric

Date:
1931
Publisher/Studio:
Los Angeles, CA: Electro String Instrument Corporation

This Gibson Super 400 was designed for 1930s guitarist Muzzy Marcellino, who asked Gibson to make him a larger, more powerful instrument. The success of this model over smaller-body guitars led other manufacturers to develop their own large-body archtops. The pick guard, with mounted electric pickups, was probably added to the instrument in the late 1940s. Acoustic or electric, the Gibson Super 400 produced a loud sound that could compete with the brass instruments in a big band.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.013
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Rickenbacker Electro Spanish (model B)

Date:
1936
Publisher/Studio:
Los Angeles, CA: Electro String Instrument Corporation

Introduced in 1935, this model was a precursor to solid-body Spanish-style electric guitars. Though parts of it are hollow, that is solely in the interest of reducing weight. In design, the Electro Spanish functions as a solid-body guitar, virtually eliminating the acoustic feedback that plagued early hollow-body electrics. Made of Bakelite, the first synthetic plastic, it has stainless-steel cavity covers, a detachable neck, and a horseshoe pickup. It also came in a Hawaiian version, which was much more popular.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.014
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Gibson Es-150

Date:
1937
Publisher/Studio:
Kalamazoo, MI: Gibson Inc.

Introduced in 1936, this was the first Spanish-style electric guitar to achieve commercial significance, thanks in part to Charlie Christian, an inventive jazz soloist who gained prominence with the Benny Goodman Sextet. Christian took what had been considered a novelty and brought it to the forefront as a lead instrument. Gibson's first electric Spanish guitar, the ES-150's design featured a one-piece steel bar surrounded by the pickup coil and two magnets below the strings, rather than the earlier horseshoe configuration with magnets directly surrounding the strings. This new pickup was nicknamed the "Christian" in honor of the great guitarist with whom it is associated.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.015
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Gibson Eh-100

Date:
1937
Publisher/Studio:
Kalamazoo, MI: Gibson Inc.

The Hawaiian, or steel, guitar was prominent in American music by the 1920s. Therefore, it is not surprising that most early commercial sales in electric guitars were for this popular style. Introduced in 1936, the EH-100 was one of Gibson's first entries in the electric guitar market. That year's model had only one control knob and a black finish. In 1937 the model was upgraded to have two control knobs and a sunburst finish, like this instrument.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
0.016
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History