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Ike’s son, historian John Eisenhower, recalls attending meetings with the British wartime leader and reflects on his character and accomplishments.

Nearing its 70th anniversary, the magazine was relaunched in digital format for 72,000 subscribers.

In 1958, my father was honored to join the staff of American Heritage, one of America’s most revered magazines, eventually becoming its Managing Editor and helping many historians strengthen their writing. Read more >>

The great tragedy of the twenty-eighth President as witnessed by his loyal lieutenant, the thirty-first

A third of a century since his defeat and death, most of the passion that surrounded Woodrow Wilson in life is spent. Read more >>

Divisions in society and religion that still exist today resulted from the "Great Awakenings" of the 18th Century

For my Part I can’t but think ... Read more >>

American colonial elites surrounded themselves with paintings, furniture, and other objects to shape their identities, and set themselves apart from other elements of society

Patrick Henry adhered to five ideas that drove him and his neighbors first to resist, and then to declare themselves independent of Great Britain.

It is one of the most familiar incidents in American history, and also one of the least understood in many ways

A little after 9:00 p.m. on March 5, 1770, a detachment of British soldiers fired into a crowd of townspeople on King Street in Boston, in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The result—the “Boston Massacre”—has echoed through the pages of newspapers, pamphlets, and history books ever since. Read more >>

After the French and Indian War, Britain reimagined North America and created hundreds of maps to bring about that vision after gaining vast new territories

During negotiations to end the Seven Years’ War, Great Britain’s diplomats used the leverage that came with conquests in Canada, India, Africa, and the West Indies to gain large territorial cessions from France and Spain. Read more >>
Early in October 1918, the Meuse-Argonne offensive smashed into Germany’s Hindenburg line.  Allies outnumbered the enemy eight-to-one but the offensive stalled.  Germans had laced the Argonne Forest with machine guns.  A cold October drizzle turned roads into muck. Read more >>

Thomas Paine's Common Sense helped Americans "decide upon the propriety of separation,” as George Washington said.

In May 1775 the Reverend Jonathan Boucher, rowing across the Potomac, met George Washington rowing in the other direction on his way to the Continental Congress. The two conversed briefly on the fate of the colonies, and Boucher asked Washington if he supported independence. Read more >>

Interest in the outlaw has grown recently with the discovery of the first authenticated photographs of Henry McCarty, who died at the age of 21 after a short, notorious life of gambling and gunfights.

By war-making and shrewd negotiating, the 11th president expanded U.S. territory by a third.

IN FEBRUARY 28, 1848, President James K. Polk received a visit from Ambrose Sevier of Arkansas, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, bearing bad news. Read more >>

John Nicolay and John Hay were Lincoln’s two closest aides in the White House, and helped to craft the image of the President we have today.

Because of wartime gas rationing, Congress and the Administration debated cancelling the famous gridiron match-up between Army and Navy in 1942. President Roosevelt found a novel solution.

In the weeks after Pearl Harbor, the Japanese conquered most of the areas of Southeast Asia that produced rubber and cut off supply to the U.S. Read more >>

Working closely with President Lincoln, Secretary of War Stanton was indefatigable in laboring to win the Civil War. But his abruptness could sometimes be counterproductive.

Members of the Maryland Forces guard memories of a dramatic history at Fort Frederick, the best preserved fort from the former English colonies in America. 

As I drove through the Maryland woods to old Fort Freder Read more >>

The modern version of an African-American spiritual has helped draw together people fighting for a better life

At Fisk Universit Read more >>

New evidence reveals that in what became the first modern campaign for President, John Kennedy worked tirelessly for four years to win the White House – much longer than Theodore White and historians had thought.

Charles Overby, founding CEO of the Newseum in Washington, D.C., recently interviewed long-time political reporters for the Boston Globe, Tom Oliphant and Curtis Wilkie, about revelations they uncovered in researching their new book about John F. Read more >>

Once the most famous Chinese dish in America, chop suey helped spur the growth of Chinese restaurants. A Smithsonian curator is now criss-crossing the country to research its beginnings. 

Sir Arthur Clarke predicted that a revolution in communications would bring electronic mail, telecommuting, the Internet, and inexpensive long distance calls in a seminal but forgotten 1962 essay, published by American Heritage more than half a century ago.

Today, Arthur Clarke is remembered as a writer of science fiction and the screenplay for the 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey. But Clarke was also a serious futurist and one of the first writers to suggest that rockets could be used for communication, not just military purposes. Read more >>

Veeck changed baseball forever, integrating the American League in 1949 and creating a variety of stunts and promotions to bring more fans to the stadium.

Entering the friendly confines of Wrigley Field in Chicago, a first-time visitor cannot help but be struck by the panorama of ivy-covered brick outfield walls, the traditional manually operated scoreboard, and an overall scale and proportion that seems perfect for baseball. Read more >>

She functioned as Franklin Roosvelt's de facto chief-of-staff, yet Missy LeHand's role has been misrepresented and overlooked by historians.

Franklin D. Read more >>

Desperate to win a major victory in 1864, the South suffered one of the bloodiest days of the Civil War at the now often-forgotten battle of Franklin.

The Statue of Liberty has been glorified, romanticized, trivialized, and over-publicized. But the meaning of “Liberty Enlightening the World” is still everything. 

On its way to gold fields in Montana, the riverboat sank in the Missouri and its hull and cargo eventually covered with mud. The author helped recover more than 200,000 Civil War-era artifacts from the remains of the Bertrand after they were found in a Nebraska cornfield.

Caroline Millard and Mary Atchison, two young mothers each with two young children, were worried as they boarded the steamboat Bertrand at Omaha's bustling waterfront on the Missouri River. Read more >>

Cowhands careless with branding irons invited a fatal attack of lead poisoning or the nether end of a rope.

Text to come Read more >>

A magnificent historical center portrays the heroic tale of the Lone Star State.

text to come Read more >>

Their trails pioneered new frontiers and colored the social, political and economic pattern of a nation.

Text to come Read more >>

This quiet Hudson River city became the "cradle of New York State."

Text to come. Read more >>

Its peculiarly local exuberance is nourished by rare traditions and an untamed individualism.

This Is Texas. Improbable event, incredible success, unprofitable loyalty, colossal hardship, heart-breaking failure went into its making. Read more >>