Permit

Date:
1929
Creator:
Department of the Interior, Republic of Liberia

This Permit of Residence allows Margaretta S. Ridgely to live for one year in Liberia. Then sixty years old, Margaretta spent 1929 as her twenty-fifth year residing in the country where she served as an Episcopal missionary and founded a school for girls. Instead of collecting her salary as a missionary, Margaretta redirected the funds to support the efforts of a missionary in China.

Description (physical):

Material: Paper. L: 27.5cm, W: 21.5cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP14868
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

Runaway Reward Notice

Date:
1791
Creator:
Charles Carnan Ridgely

Charles Carnan Ridgely was seeking the return of his slave Bateman and offered a reward that increased in size as the distance from Hampton grew. Remarkably, despite his considerable height and history as a runaway, Bateman later became a most favored slave as a jockey for Ridgely’s racehorses. He was even given a horse of his own to ride.

Description (physical):

Material: Paper. L: 22.5cm, W: 20.5cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP6910
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

In The Garden (corns, Beans, And Squash)

Date:
2003
Creator:
Marie Watt

This piece, which forms a part of the National Museum of the American Indian's young but vital collection of contemporary art, speaks to the concerns and experiences of Native people today. It addresses memory, history, the significance of place for Native communities, and the continuing relevance of cultural traditions.

Description (physical):

Material: Reclaimed wool blankets, Satin Bindings, Thread.

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
26.5807
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Jimi Hendrix's Patchwork Leather Coat

This panel and object exhibition highlights Native people who have been active participants in contemporary music for nearly a century. Musicians like Russell "Big Chief" Moore (Gila River Indian Community), Rita Coolidge (Cherokee), Buffy Sainte-Marie (Cree), and the group Redbone are a few of the Native performing artists who have had successful careers in popular music. Many have been involved in various forms of popular music--from jazz and blues to folk, country, and rock. Read more »

Description (physical):

Material: Leather

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.002
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Lakota Model Baby Carrier With Porcupine-quill Embroidery, North Or South Dakota, Ca. 1880

Date:
1880

This Lakota baby carrier is a featured item in the Our Universes collection. The collection focuses on indigenous cosmologies--worldviews and philosophies related to the creation and order of the universe--and the spiritual relationship between humankind and the natural world. Organized around the solar year, the exhibition introduces visitors to indigenous peoples from across the Western Hemisphere who continue to express the wisdom of their ancestors in celebration, language, art, spirituality, and daily life.

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
12.2308.
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Blackfeet woman's beaded dress, ca. 1890

Date:
1890

This dress, made by the Blackfeet tribe, represents the Our Peoples collection. The collection details the interactions between American Indians and Europeans over the last 500 years. In the struggle for survival, nearly every Native community wrestled with the impact of deadly new diseases and weaponry, the weakening of traditional spirituality, and the seizure of homelands by invading governments. But the story of these last five centuries is not entirely a story of destruction. It is also about how Native people intentionally and strategically kept their cultures alive.

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
13.2383
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Chiricahua Apache Gutálsi'á' (hide painting) representing the Na'ii'es, or puberty ceremony, made by Naiche, ca. 1900

Date:
1900
Creator:
Naiche

This hide painting, painted by the Apache chief Naiche, depicts an Apache puberty ceremony, called 'Na'ii'es.'

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
13.2383
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Strawberry And Chocolate

Date:
2000
Creator:
Gail Tremblay

This sculpture, molded by Gail Tremblay of the Onondaga and Mi'kmaq tribes, conveys a sense of identity as part of the Our Lives collection. The main section of Our Lives centers on various layers of identity. For Native people, identity--who you are, how you dress, what you think, where you fit in, and how you see yourself in the world--has been shaped by language, place, community membership, social and political consciousness, and customs and beliefs. But Native identity has also been influenced by a legacy of legal policies that have sought to determine who is Indian and who is not. The issue of Native identity continues to resonate today, as Native people across the Americas seek to claim the future on their own terms.

Description (physical):

H: 229cm.

Location:
4th St and Independence Ave SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
25.7273
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian

Fender Precision Bass

Publisher/Studio:
Fullerton, CA: Fender Electric Instrument Company

Leo Fender revolutionized the music world with his 1951 electric Precision Bass, and guitarist Monk Montgomery is credited with making the instrument a musical sensation. Although there were earlier stand-up electric basses, the "P Bass" was the first to be played like a standard guitar. It was also the first guitar to have the distinctive double cutaways. By far the most famous and popular electric bass ever made, its name is often used generically for any electric bass guitar. This model is finished in shell pink, a very popular custom color of the time.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
10.025
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Gretsch White Penguin

Date:
1956
Publisher/Studio:
Brooklyn, NY: Fred Gretsch Manufacturing Company

This rare solid-body electric model is one of fewer than 100 manufactured. Introduced in 1955, the White Penguin never appeared in the Gretsch catalog, despite the top-of-the-line appointments, like the "Cadillac" tailpiece, for which Gretsch was known. It was part of the Duo-Jet series and is the solid-body companion of the more popular electric archtop model, the White Falcon. Gretsch was best known for its hollow-body electrics, which were favored by the company's primarily jazz and country music clientele.

Location:
National Museum of American History Room 334, MRC 604 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW Smithsonian Institution P.O. Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012 Washington DC , District of Columbia
Identifier:
10.026
Institution:
Smithsonian National Museum of American History