Queen Bleriot

Date:
1911

This image shows the Queen airplane that Earle Ovington flew on his brief air mail flight in 1911. The Queen was based on the popular Blériot monoplane design.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
73-2252
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Wind Tunnel

This photograph depicts the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics' (NACA) Langley Memorial Laboratory, opened in 1917 with the first pressurized (variable density) wind tunnel. The laboratory, located in Hampton, Virginia and named after Samuel P. Langley, the third secretary of the Smithsonian, was used to gather precise data on wing shapes.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
9A03115
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Fokker F-27

This is a photograph of the most widely sold turboprop airliner in history, the Fokker F-27 Friendship. The F-27 first entered service in 1958, when it began flying with West Coast Airlines.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
9A04294
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Pan Am 707 Airport

Date:
1958

This photograph captures the first jet service by any U.S. airline began on October 26, 1958, when this Pan American World Airways Boeing 707, the Clipper America, left New York for Paris.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
9A03276
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Boeing 707

A Boeing 707, such as this aircraft, was designed for transcontinen¬tal or one-stop transatlantic range. But modified with extra fuel tanks and more efficient turbofan engines, 707-300s could fly nonstop across the Atlantic. Boeing built 855 707s.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
NASM-95-9043
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Boeing 747

This is a photograph of the Boeing 747. Designed originally for Pan American to replace the 707, the giant Boeing 747 revolutionized long-distance air travel when it entered service in 1970.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
0.002
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Emily Howell

Emily Howell broke through the gender barrier to become the first American woman to fly routinely for a scheduled U.S. commercial airline. An experienced pilot when regional carrier Frontier Airlines hired her as a second officer in 1973, Howell soon advanced to first officer (co-pilot) and then to captain.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
NASM-92-16871
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Racing To The Moon Exhibit

Date:
1969
Creator:
Neil Armstrong, (1930-)

Neil Armstrong took this picture of Buzz Aldrin on the Moon during the Apollo 11 mission. As the first human setting foot on the moon, Armstrong remarked,"That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind."

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
69-HC-684
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

John Ridgely Iii And Lillian Ketcham Ridgely

Date:
1943
Creator:
Bradford Bachrach

This photograph shows John Ridgely III (1911-1990) and his wife Lillian Ketcham Ridgely (1908-1996); both served their country during World War II. John served overseas in the Pacific theater in the Army Air Corps. Lil, serving as a nurse, was commissioned a lieutenant in the Women’s Army Corps. This photograph of the couple in uniform together was taken in the studios of the country’s leading portrait photographers, originally founded in Baltimore in 1868 by David Bachrach (1845-1921).

Description (physical):

Material: Paper. H: 27.8, W: 21.5.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP 34414
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

Margaretta Sophia Howard Ridgely

Date:
1865
Publisher/Studio:
Baltimore, MD

This carte-de-visite taken in a Baltimore photo studio around the end of the Civil War shows Margaretta Sophia Howard Ridgely (1824-1904), wife of Hampton’s fourth master Charles Ridgely (1830-1872). Her maternal grandfather was Governor Charles Carnan Ridgely, meaning that she and her husband were first cousins. Margaretta, raised at “Cowpens,” an estate just to the east of Hampton, had been a childhood playmate of her Ridgely cousins. The mother of eight children, after her husband’s untimely death in Rome in 1872, she returned to Hampton and managed the estate until her own death 32 years later.

Description (physical):

Material: Cardboard, Paper. H: 10.8cm, W: 5.7cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP31234
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site