20 Good Reasons To Study The Civil War

Date:
2004
Creator:
Waugh, John C.
Publisher/Studio:
Abilene, Texas: McWhiney Foundation Press

Short summaries and examples of reasons to study the Civil War. While some of his 20 reasons seem a bit artificial, it is well written, concise and the price is right for just about any teacher who is looking to find new ways to present American history. Lots of good points here.

Description (physical):

Paperback, 5.5" x 8.5", 96 pages

Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

The 4th Michigan Volunteer Infantry At Gettysburg

Date:
1997
Creator:
Bertera, Martin Nino
Publisher/Studio:
Dayton, Ohio: Morningside House, Inc.

This is a standard regimental history describing how the 4th Michigan was recruited, where they served, how many died and even includes pictures of several of their tombstones. For those with a desire for more in-depth knowledge about this specific unit or about the Battle for the Wheatfield at Gettysburg.

Description (physical):

Hardback, Standard Size, 187 pages with Index, Roster, photos

Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

The 4th Michigan Infantry At The Battle Of New Bridge, Virginia

Date:
2003
Creator:
Bertera, Martin Nino
Publisher/Studio:
Wyandotte, MI: Tillieagnes Press

Another look at the 4th Michigan but this time focused on its participation in the Battle of New Bridge as part of the skirmishing that preceded the Seven Days Battles. We learn that the Highland Springs Golf Course is presently located where this battle took place just outside of Richmond.

Description (physical):

Paperback, 5.5." x 8.5", 112 pages with Index and Rosters

Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

Pipe Of Jefferson Davis

Date:
c. 1865
Creator:
Kaldenberg and Sons, New York City

The pipe belonged to Jefferson Davis and was used by him during his confinement (1865-1867) at Fort Monroe.

Description (physical):

A Meerschaum pipe, consisting of four eagle claw talons around a pale yellow up-turned bowl. It is 8.5 inches long and weighs 8 oz. There is a silver colored metal band from the tip of the stem. There are bite marks around the tip of the stem.

Location:
20 Bernard Rd Hampton,Virginia 23651
Identifier:
MNRO 0068
Institution:
Fort Monroe Casemate Museum

Spanish 12 Pounder Bronze Gun

Date:
July 6, 1767

This 12-pounder, EL TOSICO (The Poisonous One), is dated 6 July 1767. Like EL TORO, it was made for King Charles III and displays his cipher on the first reinforce. It was also a Mexican War trophy, and as an inscription on the breech face indicates - was lost and recovered at the Norfolk Naval Yard during the Civil War.

Description (physical):

Material: Bronze.

Location:
805 Kidder Breese Street SE 20374
Identifier:
61-84-EQ
Institution:
Naval Historical Center

Spanish 12 Pounder Bronze Gun

Date:
May 1, 1767
Publisher/Studio:
Barcelona

This Barcelona 12-pounder is EL TORO (The Bull), made on 1 May 1767. A V-notch rear sight is cast into the breech ring, with a small front sight blade on the swell of the muzzle. This simple arrangement indicates the importance of point-blank firing in the age of smoothbore gunnery. EL TORO passed into Mexican hands when that country won its independence from Spain and was captured by naval forces during the Mexican War.

Description (physical):

Material: Bronze.

Location:
805 Kidder Breese Street SE 20374
Identifier:
61-84-O
Institution:
Naval Historical Center

U.S. Army 24 Pounder Bronze Howitzer

Date:
1858
Creator:
Cyrus Alger and Company
Publisher/Studio:
Boston

This is a U.S. Army 24-pounder howitzer, made from an 1844 model. Markings on its trunnions show that it was made at Boston in 1858 by Cyrus Alger and Company. The initials B.H. on the muzzle face are those of Major Benjamin Huger, then an inspector of ordnance for the Army and later a major general in the Confederate service. This piece passed into Confederate hands during the Civil War and, as the inscription on the breech shows, was recaptured when Morris Island, Charleston, S.C., was evacuated after a long siege by Rear Admiral S. P. Lee's North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.

Description (physical):

Material: Bronze.

Location:
805 Kidder Breese Street SE 20374
Identifier:
61-84-AM
Institution:
Naval Historical Center

4 Pounder Bronze Gun

This 4-pound gun lacks national markings, but records indicate that it was captured during the war of 1812; its vent field is conspicuously mutilated by extensive drilling or hammering with a pick-like instrument. Its general configuration dates it in the second half of the 18th century, or, possibly, the first years of the 19th. The 4-pounder, as noted under No. 2 above, was a Continental caliber although some iron 4-pounders were in British service until about 1800. It may well have been purchased or captured by the English, since trophy guns were often put to use. It was at the Norfolk Navy Yard when the Civil War began, making it likely that is was originally captured at sea. Its small caliber means that, in all probability, it armed a privateer or armed merchant.

Description (physical):

Material: Bronze.

Location:
805 Kidder Breese Street SE 20374
Identifier:
61-84-AB
Institution:
Naval Historical Center

Austrian 6 Pounder Bronze Rifled Howitzer

Date:
1854
Publisher/Studio:
Vienna

This is an Austrian rifled 6-pounder howitzer of a pattern, later than that of No. 1. Forged in Vienna in 1854, it has one reinforce instead of the two of No. 1, and its outline is noticeably more functional, lacking the older weapons ornamental rings and astragals. In dimensions and lines, though, the relation between older and newer pieces shows clearly. The howitzer has the same type of sights as the 1843 weapon and, like it, was captured from the blockade runner Columbia. A trophy inscription on No. 3 commemorates this. A number of Austrian rifled howitzers were bought and used by the Confederacy; 6-pounders like this can be seen at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, as well as at Petersburg and Fort Monroe, Virginia; two bronze 24-pounder howitzers are at Gettysburg National Military Park. Seven pieces of this type were sold to the Grand Army of the Republic in 1883 to be melted down and cast into members' badges for that association of Union veterans.

Description (physical):

Material: Bronze.

Location:
805 Kidder Breese Street SE 20374
Identifier:
61-84-GN
Institution:
Naval Historical Center

Austrian 6 Pounder Bronze Rifled Howitzer

Date:
1852
Publisher/Studio:
Vienna

This is an Austrian rifled 6-pounder howitzer of a pattern, later than that of No. 1. Made in Vienna in 1852, it has one reinforce instead of the two of No. 1, and its outline is noticeably more functional, lacking the older weapons ornamental rings and astragals. In dimensions and lines, though, the relation between older and newer pieces shows clearly. The howitzer has the same type of sights as the 1843 weapon and, like it, was captured from the blockade runner Columbia. A trophy inscription on No. 3 commemorates this. A number of Austrian rifled howitzers were bought and used by the Confederacy; 6-pounders like this can be seen at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, as well as at Petersburg and Fort Monroe, Virginia; two bronze 24-pounder howitzers are at Gettysburg National Military Park. Seven pieces of this type were sold to the Grand Army of the Republic in 1883 to be melted down and cast into members' badges for that association of Union veterans.

Description (physical):

Material: Bronze.

Location:
805 Kidder Breese Street SE 20374
Identifier:
61-84-GO
Institution:
Naval Historical Center