Runaway Reward Notice

Date:
1791
Creator:
Charles Carnan Ridgely

Charles Carnan Ridgely was seeking the return of his slave Bateman and offered a reward that increased in size as the distance from Hampton grew. Remarkably, despite his considerable height and history as a runaway, Bateman later became a most favored slave as a jockey for Ridgely’s racehorses. He was even given a horse of his own to ride.

Description (physical):

Material: Paper. L: 22.5cm, W: 20.5cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP6910
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

Howard Ridgely And Otho Ridgely

Date:
1862

Howard Ridgely (1855-1900) and his younger brother Otho Ridgely (1856-1929) pose for a studio photograph with their pet squirrel on a leash. Other Ridgely family children kept pets, and their aunt Eliza "Didy" Ridgely White Buckler (1828-1894) also had a pet squirrel, whose antics she described in her journal in 1842.

Description (physical):

Studio photograph. Material: Paper, cardboard. H: 9.1cm, W: 6cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP18049
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

The Civil War In Maryland

Date:
1983
Creator:
Daniel C. Toomey
Publisher/Studio:
Baltimore, MD: Toomey Press

Overview of Civil War in the state of Maryland.

Description (physical):

Hardback

Location:
301 East Pratt Street Baltimore, Maryland 21201
Identifier:
E566.T66, LCCN: 83-51066
Institution:
USS Constellation Museum

D.R. Miller House, With Family On Porch, Hagerstown Pike, Antietam, Maryland

This photograph shows the Miller house in Sharpsburg, Maryland. The Battle of Antietam commenced as Union soldiers under Major General Joseph Hooker attacked Rebel soldiers in the Miller cornfield, causing severe casualties for both sides.

Description (physical):

Photoprint

Location:
10 1st St SE, Washington, District of Columbia 20003
Identifier:
LC-USZ62-104417
Institution:
Library of Congress

Burnside's Attack Toward Sharpsburg

Creator:
Edwin Forbes (1839-1895)

This reproduction of a print by American landscape painter and etcher Edwin Forbes (1839-1895) shows soldiers under the command of Ambrose Burnside fighting at the Battle of Antietam, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, on September 17, 1862. Burnside’s failure to perform sufficient reconnaissance on the southern flank of the Union line caused him to attempt to take a bridge (subsequently known as “Burnside’s Bridge”) that was covered by heavy Confederate fire. The resulting impasse contributed to the tactical stalemate in which the battle ended.

Description (physical):

H: 6 1/6", W: 9 5/16"

Location:
Gaithersburg, Maryland
Identifier:
2010.0002.0010
Institution:
American Heritage Archives

Antietam Then And Now

Date:
2005
Creator:
Adelman, Garry E.
Publisher/Studio:
Gettysburg, PA: Thomas Publications

Good photographs of the battlefield juxtaposed with modern photos from the identical point of view.

Description (physical):

Softcover, 8.5" x 11", 55 p.

Location:
6125 Boydton Plank Rd.Petersburg,Virginia 23803
Institution:
Pamplin Historical Park and the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier

Captain Charles Ridgely

Date:
1767
Creator:
John Hesselius

Captain Charles Ridgely (1733-1790) was the builder and first master of Hampton. A ship’s captain in his early career (note the telescope depicted in his hand), he retired from the sea and assumed control of the family iron business in 1763. He also operated a mercantile business in Baltimore Town; owned vast farms and plantations cultivating grain and vegetable crops; bred cattle, pigs, and thoroughbred horses; planted commercial orchards; and operated mills and quarries. Profits from his Northampton ironworks during the Revolutionary War and from confiscated Loyalist properties helped fund the building of  Ridgely’s “house in the forest” beginning in 1783. Captain Ridgely had resided there for little over a year at the time of his death.

Description (physical):

Material: Oil on Canvass. H: 76.2cm, W: 63.5cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP 1144
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

Rebecca Dorsey Ridgely

Date:
1767
Creator:
John Hesselius

The wife of Captain Charles Ridgely (1733-1790), builder of Hampton, Rebecca Dorsey Ridgely (1739-1812) was the daughter of Caleb Dorsey of “Belmont,” an Anne Arundel County iron master. The two were married in 1760, the year Capt. Ridgely with his father and brother John established the Northampton Iron Works. This portrait and the one of Capt. Ridgely were painted by the noted American artist John Hesselius, who by 1763 was living in Annapolis and painting many portraits of Maryland’s landed gentry. Although fashionably dressed in luxurious clothing for this portrait, Rebecca later became an ardent convert to Methodism, and was a friend and supporter of the earliest Methodist preacher in America, Robert Strawbridge.

Description (physical):

Material: Oil on Canvass. H: 75cm, W: 63.5cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP1145
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

Charles Carnan Ridgely

Date:
1950 (after 1820 original)
Creator:
C. G. Stapko (after Thomas Sully)

Charles Carnan Ridgely (1760-1829), son of John and Achsah Ridgely Carnan, sister of Captain Charles Ridgely (1733-1790), was educated and trained in business by his uncle. When Capt. Ridgely died childless in 1790, Charles Ridgely Carnan inherited the Hampton estate, iron furnaces, and additional property, on the condition he change his surname to Ridgely. Charles Carnan Ridgely eventually owned more than 25,000 acres of land in northern Maryland and over 300 slaves. In addition to his vast agricultural, industrial, and commercial interests, he served as a representative from Baltimore County in the Maryland legislature from 1790-1795, as a state senator from 1796-1800, and as a three-term governor of Maryland, ending in 1819. Known throughout his life as General Ridgely, Charles Carnan Ridgely’s military record culminated with his appointment as a brigadier general in the state militia in 1796. His original 1820 portrait by Thomas Sully was donated by John Ridgely, Jr. to National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. in 1945.

Description (physical):

Material: Oil on Canvass. H: 122cm, W: 97.2cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP1189
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site

Priscilla Dorsey Ridgely

Date:
1805
Creator:
Rembrandt Peale (copy)

In 1782, Charles Ridgely Carnan married Priscilla Hill Dorsey (1762-1814), the youngest sister of his uncle Capt. Charles Ridgely’s wife, Rebecca Dorsey Ridgely. The first two mistresses of Hampton were sisters. During her 22-year marriage, she bore her husband 14 children, and 11  survived to adulthood, a remarkable percentage in those days. Like her older sister, Priscilla was an ardent Methodist renowned for her piety, a trait she passed on to most of her eight daughters. The restrained style of her clothing as seen in this portrait further reflects her Methodist views. The painting at Hampton is an early 19th century copy of the original by Rembrandt Peale, now owned by the State of Maryland and exhibited at the Governor’s Mansion in Annapolis.

Description (physical):

Material: Oil on canvas. H: 75cm, W: 62.2cm.

Location:
535 Hampton Lane Towson,Maryland 21286
Identifier:
HAMP1094
Institution:
Hampton National Historic Site