Douglas D-558-2

Publisher/Studio:
Douglas Aircraft Co.

Piloted by A. Scott Crossfield, on November 20, 1953, the Douglas D-558-2 Skyrocket became the first aircraft to fly faster than Mach 2, twice the speed of sound. Air-launched from a U.S. Navy Boeing P2B-1S (B-29) the swept-wing, rocket-powered D-558-2 reached Mach 2.005 in a shallow dive at 18,898 meters (62,000 feet).

The D-558 series of aircraft was developed by Douglas under the direction of Edward H. Heinemann for the U.S. Navy to explore transonic and supersonic flight. The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA, the predecessor to NASA), used this Skyrocket, the second one built, to explore the flight characteristics of swept-wing aircraft. It set several other speed and altitude records before the program ended in 1956.

Description (physical):

White, US Navy, single-seat, rocket-powered supersonic aircraft. Material: Aluminum. H: 3.9m, W: 7.6m, L: 12.8m, Wt: 9421lbs., Top Speed: 2078km/hr.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
A19610108000CP11
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Grumman FM-1 (F4F-4) Wildcat

Date:
1940
Publisher/Studio:
Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation

Leroy Grumman's F4F Wildcat was not the fastest or most advanced fighter aircraft of World War II, but during the dark months after Pearl Harbor, Wildcat pilots stood firm, held the line, and stopped the Imperial Japanese military air forces when they seemed invincible. After war erupted in the Pacific, the Grumman F4F Wildcat was the primary fighter aircraft operated by the United States Navy and the Marine Corps. By 1942 every American Navy fighter squadron flew the F4F. Read more »

Description (physical):

Single engine, mid-wing, carrier-based fighter aircraft. Material: Semi-monocoque all-metal.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington,District of Columbia20560
Identifier:
A19610122000cp36
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Sikorsky UH-34D Seahorse

Date:
Silorsky Aircraft

Beginning in 1962, the H-34 served as the primary Marine Corps assault helicopter of the Vietnam War until its replacement by the turbine-powered CH-46. It began in 1952 as a Navy anti-submarine warfare helicopter evolved from the Sikorsky S-55 series. Initially designated as the HSS-1, it would also go on to see significant service in the combat assault and utility roles with the Army and Marine Corps. Great Britain and France also deployed versions in some of the first helicopter combat assault operations. Read more »

Description (physical):

All equipment that came with the helicopter that is not attached to it is contained in box A19750823002 with the exception of two items. The VIP steps that attach to the side of the aircraft and the long-handled tool to assist with main rotor blade deployment are stored inside the helicopter's cabin. H: 16', W: 15', L: 47', Wt: 7560lbs.

Location:
Independence Ave at 6th Street, SW Washington, District of Columbia 20560
Identifier:
A19750823000cp12
Institution:
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Our Naval Apprentice Vol. Ii 1902

Date:
1902-1903
Creator:
Naval Training Station, Newport, Rhode Island
Publisher/Studio:
Newport, Rhode Island: Naval Training Station

Bound issues of "Our Naval Apprentice" a monthly newsletter devoted to the interests of Apprentices and Enlisted Men of the United States Navy.

Description (physical):

Harback

Location:
301 East Pratt Street Baltimore, Maryland 21201
Identifier:
2006.20.34, LCCN:
Institution:
USS Constellation Museum