Richard M. Ketchum

Richard M. Ketchum's picture

A long-time editor with American Heritage, Richard M. Ketchum is the author of the Revolutionary War classics Decisive Day: The Battle of Bunker Hill; The Winter Soldiers: The Battles for Trenton and Princeton; the award-winning New York Times Notable Book Saratoga: Turning Point of America's Revolutionary War; and, most recently, Divided Loyalties: How the American Revolution Came to New York. Born in Pittsburgh, Ketchum served in the Navy during World War II. He lives in Vermont.

Articles by this Contributor

October 1972

Common Sense was a bestseller and turned the tide of public feeling toward independence, but for its author ingratitude followed fame.

December 1973

Clark’s career was like the passage of a meteor—a quick, fiery moment that lit up the heavens for all to see and wonder at, then vanishing in oblivion.

April 1973

Crowds on both sides of the Atlantic shouted “Wilkes and Liberty!” after he was jailed and thrown out of Parliament for defending the rights of Colonists and the “middling and inferior sort of people who stand most in need of protection.”

June 1973

Perhaps the most experienced general in the American army, he was credited with shouting “Don’t fire until you see the whites of their eyes!” at Bunker Hill. But “Old Put” was not without his faults.

April 1974

The brothers were expected to perform an almost impossible task, subduing a people of the same flesh and blood and heritage.

February 1975

When one of the wealthiest men in the Colonies sided with the Patriot cause, he was called a “wretched and plundered tool of the Boston rebels.”

October 1975

Much of our knowledge about the British conduct of the war comes from Mackenzie’s eight volumes of diaries and drawings, including accounts of some of the critical early battles of the Revolution.