April/may 1983

Volume 34
Issue 3

Features 

Antonio Jacobsen, the most prolific of all American marine artists

How a shy millionaire’s peculiar genius transformed his “country place” into an unparalleled showcase of American furnishings
A HERITAGE PRESERVED

We built a merchant marine despite the opposition of the Royal Navy, went on to develop the most beautiful of all sailing ships, and held our supremacy for years. But how do we measure up today?

An Interview With Edward L. Beach
The captain who first took a submarine around the world underwater looks at the U.S. Navy past and present and tells us what we must learn from the Falklands war

She was the first whaleship ever sunk by her prey. But that’s not why she’s remembered.

An extraordinary World War I naval operation is recounted by the commander of a decaying coastal steamer crammed with a terrifying new explosive

was the first magazine in America to change its cover for every issue. And these covers may still be the best graphic art magazine has ever produced.

The storm that wrecked the Virginia-bound ship Sea Venture in 1609 inspired a play by Shakespeare— and the survivors’ tribulations may well have sown the first seeds of democracy in the New World

The fascinating contents of a newly discovered document of the War of 1812

Twentieth-century answers to that question have much less to do with the health and happiness of the retiree than we have been led to believe

April/may 1983

Departments 

AMERICAN CHARACTERS

CORRESPONDENCE

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

POSTSCRIPTS

READERS’ ALBUM

THE TIME MACHINE