April/may 1985

Volume 36
Issue 3

Features 

Magnificently impractical and obsolete almost as soon as they were built, the cable lines briefly dominated urban transportation throughout the country

It was a hundred years ago, and the game has changed a good deal since then. But there are plenty of people who still hold that cranky old Hoss Radbourn was the finest that ever lived.

One of the country’ more bizzarre labor disputes pitted a crowed of outraged newsboys against two powerful opponents—Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolf Hearst

After he was drafted in April 1941, Harvey Weber, a New York photographer, became a first lieutenant in charge of the 166th Signal Photo Company assigned to the Third Army. Landing at Utah Beach on June 14,1944, with the 79th Infantry Division, he ended up a year later with the V Corps in Czechoslovakia. “We roamed about freely within the boundaries of our division or corps,” Weber recalls, “and if you kept your nose clean, it was really possible to get around.” Now retired as director of photography at Newsday , Weber recently dug through his files to unearth this impressive personal record of the European war that ended forty years ago this May. Nearly all of these photographs, reproduced with Weber’s own captions, are published here for the first time.

Anonymous

Walden is here, of course; but so too is Fanny Farmer’s first cookbook

While a whole generation of artists sought inspiration in the wilderness, George Inness was painting the fields and farms of a man-made countryside

The twenties and thirties saw a host of new ways to separate customers from their money. The methods have not been forgotten.

Forty years ago, a tangle of chaotic events led to the death of Hitler, the surrender of the Nazis, and the end of World War II in Europe

April/may 1985

Departments 

CORRESPONDENCE

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

MATTERS OF FACT

POSTSCRIPTS TO HISTORY

THE BUSINESS OF AMERICA

THE TIME MACHINE