February/March 1979

Volume 30
Issue 2

Features 

These immaculate and minutely detailed aerial views flattered the resident and attracted the investor

Anonymous
Anonymous

Today’s city, for all its ills, is “cleaner, less crowded, safer, and more livable than its turn-of-the-century counterpart,” argues this eminent urban historian. Yet two new problems are potentially fatal.

One hundred years ago, Congress created two agencies—the U.S. Geological Survey and the Bureau of Ethnology. Both, according to the author, have since “given direction, form, and stimulation to the science of earth and the science of man, and in so doing have touched millions of lives.”

The story of the world’s longest-running radio program and the extraordinary American music it helped make popular

What the public wanted, it seemed, was a vice and bootleg business netting sixty million dollars a year-and many gangland funerals

When Theodore Roosevelt—Harvard-educated, dandified, and just twenty-three—arrived in Albany as an assemblyman in 1882, the oldpols dismissed him as a “Punkin-Lily,”and worse. They were in for a shock.

A young girl’s memories of life in a community haunted by

NOTES FROM A CENTURY OF GOVERNMENT SCIENCE

Anonymous
February/March 1979

Departments 

A HERITAGE PRESERVED

AMERICAN CHARACTERS

GOOD READING

POSTSCRIPTS

READERS’ ALBUM