July/August 1989

Volume 40
Issue 5

Features 

Remember the excitement of the 1924 Olympics in Chariots of Fire? That was nothing compared with what the U.S. rugby team did to the French at those games.

In the years between the dedication of the Statue of Liberty and the First World War, the Divine Sarah was, for hundreds of thousands of Americans, the single most compelling embodiment of the French Republic

When the French Revolution broke out two hundred years ago this month, Americans greeted it enthusiastically. After all, without the French we could never have become free. But the cheers faded as the brutality of the convulsion emerged—and we saw we were still only a feeble newborn facing a giant, intimidating world power.

The Tin Lizzie carried us into the twentieth century, but she gave us a hell of a shaking along the way. Now a veteran driver tells what everybody knew and nobody bothered to write down.

It cannot be measured in dollars alone. It involved a kind of personal power no man of affairs will ever have again.

July/August 1989

Departments 

EDITORS’ BOOKSHELF

HISTORY HAPPENED HERE

IN THE NEWS

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

POSTSCRIPTS TO HISTORY

THE BUSINESS OF AMERICA

THE LIFE AND TIMES

THE TIME MACHINE