July/August 1992

Volume 43
Issue 4

Features 

The elder statesman sets the record straight on JFK, LBJ, Stalin, the bomb, Charles de Gaulle, Douglas MacArthur—and, most of all, the American Presidency

An Art Deco masterpiece struggles to survive

Anonymous

That’s what everyone agreed. Jim Thorpe was at the 1912 Olympics, but legend had to make him even more—and draconian rules had to take it all away

On the hundredth anniversary of the unsolved double murder of Andrew and Abby Borden, is it time to ask: What was going on in that family?

Seventy-five years ago this spring a very different America waded into the seminal catastrophe of the twentieth century. World War I did more than kill millions of people; it destroyed the West’s faith in the very institutions that had made it the hope and envy of the world.

Thus did Franklin Roosevelt characterize the man who was to be his running mate in 1944 and—as everyone at the astonishing Democratic Convention knew—almost certainly the next President of the United States. Here is FDR at his most devious, Harry Truman at the pivot of his career, and the old party-boss system at its zenith.

July/August 1992

Departments 

EDITORS’ BOOKSHELF

HISTORY HAPPENED HERE

IN THE NEWS

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

MY BRUSH WITH HISTORY

THE BUSINESS OF AMERICA

THE LIFE AND TIMES

THE TIME MACHINE