June 1956

Volume 7
Issue 4

Features 

John Charles Frémont never succeeded in living up to his fame, yet he was one of America’s great explorers

Stickler for a point of honor, the General marched to defeat and helped to lose a war

Her past was shady but her conscience was excellent,
and all in all she played a big part in the emancipation of women

The political convention was devised to meet an unforeseen need, and now and then it has an unexpected result

The third in a series on TIMES OF TRIAL IN AMERICAN STATECRAFT 

Old Hickory's attack on Biddle's bank had some unexpected consequences

A southern woman’s memoir of a by-gone era

Washington would be a capital of Egyptian pillars and Roman splendor if this hardware merchant’s grandiose plan had been adopted

SEAMAN HEYN’S STORY
FROM THE NAVAL ARCHIVES OF WORLD WAR II

Anonymous

Modern G. I.’s will recognize a fellow spirit in the sergeant who wrote this account of life in General Washington’s army

Anonymous

Along the Mississippi the spirit of vanished culture lingers in the ruined columns of the great plantations

For decades the private railroad car was the great symbol of wealth. Here is what it looked like in its heyday.

Roger Williams liked Indians and almost everyone else, and he founded a colony that gave our freedom a broader horizon

June 1956

Departments 

READING, WRITING AND HISTORY