June 1963

Volume 14
Issue 4

Features 

Who was the prosperous Negro in the long-lost painting? Scraps of evidence pieced together have revealed him to be

By frieght train, on foot, and in commandeered trucks, thousands of unemployed veterans descended on a nervous capital at the depth of the Depression—and were run out of town by Army bayonets

Sixty-five years before the bomb destroyed Hiroshima, a medicine man from Sf. Louis dreamed up a weapons system “so terrible and devastating” as to banish war forever. He would be, he modestly admitted, the savior of mankind

Could ironclads successfully attack land positions? No one knew. Into the very “nest of the rebellion,” sewn with mines and ringed by bristling forts, steamed the proud monitors of the Union fleet

An artist turned land agent used his paintings to promote paper townsites in Minnesota. Though most of these settlements failed to materialize, his charming record of an opening frontier remains

Of resorts and vacationers in the long ago, when the sports wore stiff collars and the dream girls five-piece bathing suits, and Americans became reacquainted with nature

The aged ex-President grew giddy and his family became alarmed as the mask-maker’s formula hardened around his venerable head

The Supreme Court has become the most powerful judicial body in the world. In a new series under the editorship of Professor John A. Garraty , AMERICAN HERITAGE examines the crucial, often bitterly fought cases that have helped define the Court s unique role as a shaper of the nation’s history

Anonymous

Long before Frémont, Jedediah Smith mapped huge regions between Salt Lake and California. He ranks beside Lewis and Clark in the annals of American exploration

Were the great business tycoons of the nineteenth century only that? A distinguished historian says no—most emphatically

The crusading conservationist thought he had saved the fur seal from extinction. Then from the Pribilofs, home of the last great herd, came an alarming telegram:

June 1963

Departments 

READING, WRITING, AND HISTORY