June/july 1983

Volume 34
Issue 4

Features 

… illuminated by the hand-tinted slides that helped make it a hit

One of the most ingenious and least known rescue missions of World War II was engineered by a young American dandy, Varian Fry, who shepherded to safety hundreds of European intellectuals wanted by the Nazis

Our fascination with categorizing ourselves was fed in 1949 by a famous essay and chart that divided us by taste into different strata of culture. Now the man who invented these classifications brings us up to date.

Most surveys of American painting begin in New England in the eighteenth century, move westward to the Rockies in the nineteenth, and return to New York in the twentieth. Now we’ll have to redraw the map .

Anonymous

THE BIRTH OF THE RAND CORPORATION During World War II, America discovered that scientists were needed to win it—and to win any future war. That’s why RAND came into being, the first think tank and the model for all the rest.

Abner Doubleday had an eventful life, but as far as we know, he never gave a thought to the game with which his name is so firmly linked

A portfolio of rare photographs recalls baseball’s rough-and-tumble vintage era

If he’d been the closest companion of the president of IBM, you might happen across his name in a privately printed memoir. But LeMoyne Billings was John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s best friend from Choate to the White House—and that makes him part of history.

Thousands of them sided with Great Britain, only to become the wandering children of the American Revolution

June/july 1983

Departments 

CORRESPONDENCE

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR: A Minor Character

POSTSCRIPTS TO HISTORY

THE TIME MACHINE