June/july 1985

Volume 36
Issue 4

Features 

The Civil War ignited the basic conflict between a free press and the need for military security. By war’s end, the hard-won compromises between soldiers and newspapermen may not have provided all the answers, but they had raised all the modern questions.

A veteran reporter looks back to a time when the stakes were really high—and vet military men actually trusted newsmen.

Westmoreland and Sharon embarked on costly lawsuits to justify their battlefield judgments. They might have done much better to listen to Mrs. William Tecumseh Sherman.

Anonymous

In 1983 our country went to war and left the press behind. The outcry that followed raised issues that first came up when Abraham Lincoln was President and still remain with us.

Anonymous

The story of AT&T from its origins in Bell’s first local call to last year’s divestiture. Hail and good-bye.

The curious story of Milford Haven

FDR’s Twenty-Four-Year War

His works ranged from intimate cameos to heroic public monuments. America has produced no greater sculptor.

A lot of people still remember how great it was to ride in the old Pullmans, how curiously regal to have a simple, well-cooked meal in the dining car. Those memories are perfectly accurate—and that lost pleasure holds a lesson for us that extends beyond mere nostalgia.

His job was to destroy German submarines. To do it, they gave him twelve men, three machine guns, four depth charges, and an old wooden fishing schooner with an engine that literally drove mechanics mad.

Slovenly, impulsive, impoverished, and grotesque, Constantine Samuel Rafinesque was the greatest naturalist of his age. But nobody knew it.

June/july 1985

Departments 

CORRESPONDENCE

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

POSTSCRIPTS TO HISTORY

READERS’ ALBUM

THE BUSINESS OF AMERICA

TIME MACHINE