October/November 1986

Volume 37
Issue 6

Features 

It took half a century for his critics to see his subjects as clearly as he did; but today he stands as America’s preeminent portraitist

Despite his feeling that “we are beginning to lose the memory of what a restrained and civil society can be like,” the senior senator from New York—a lifelong student of history—remains an optimist about our system of government and our extraordinary resilience as a people

He invented modern mass production. He gave the world the first people’s car, and his countrymen loved him for it. But at the moment of his greatest triumph, he turned on the empire he had built—and on the son who would inherit it.

A HERITAGE PRESERVED
Since 1930, more than half of America’s splendid elm trees have succumbed to disease. But science is now fighting back and gaining ground.

A newly discovered record of a proud Southern society that few people ever thought existed

Anonymous

It was born in America, it came of age in America, and in an era when foreign competition threatens so many of our industries, it still sweetens our balance of trade

Seventy-five years ago a powered kite landed on a cruiser. From that stunt grew the weaponry that has defined modern naval supremacy.

For a few weeks Hitler came close to winning World War II. Then came a train of events that doomed him. An eloquent historian reminds us that however unsatisfactory our world may be today, it almost was unimaginably worse.

Had Thomas Morton raised his maypole anywhere but next door to the Pilgrims, history and legend probably would have no record of him, his town, or his “lascivious” revels

October/November 1986

Departments 

CORRESPONDENCE

EDITORS’ BOOKSHELF

HISTORY HAPPENED HERE

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

MATTERS OF FACT

READERS’ ALBUM

THE BUSINESS OF AMERICA

THE TIME MACHINE