Ethan Allen’s Ill-Fated March on Canada

A new look at a famous Revolutionary figure questions whether history’s long-standing judgment is accurate

AT 9 O’CLOCK ON THE morning of September 25, 1775, a French Canadian habitant banged on the main gate of Montreal. The Americans were coming, he blurted breathlessly to a British officer. As drums began to rattle out the alarm and a panicky crowd filled the Place d’Armes, the farmer told Sir Guy Carleton, governor general of Canada, that an American army had crossed the St. Lawrence during the night and was marching south down the island. The invaders numbered in the hundreds.Read more »

Champlain Among The Mohawk, 1609

A Soldier-Humanist Fights a War for Peace in North America

A few generations ago, American colonial history centered on a single narrative that flowed from Jamestown in 1607 to the Declaration of Independence in 1776. Today early American history has blossomed into a braided narrative with many story lines.

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To Plan A Trip

The Lake Champlain Maritime Museum has extensive displays on the Battle of Valcour Island and the archeological explorations being made there. The museum is open daily 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., from late May to mid-October ( www.lcmm.org / 802-475-2022).

Auberge Benedict Arnold, avec bateau.
 
courtesy of auberge benedict arnold2007_2_68
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An Arnold Chronology

1741 Born in Norwich, Connecticut.

1758 Enlists in a New York company for service in the French and Indian War.

1759–73 Deserts and returns to Norwich to finish an apprenticeship as a druggist. In time becomes a successful trader and shipowner.

1774 Elected captain of militia. Read more »

On The Trail Of Benedict Arnold

Some of the infuriating questions surrounding the great hero-traitor can be answered by visiting the fields where he fought. The trip will also take you to many of the most beautiful places in the Northeast.Read more »

The Siege Of Quebec, 1775–1776

The key to control of Canada was a city whose defenders doubted they could hold out for long once the American Rebels attacked

Sixteen years after General James Wolfe’s famous assault on Quebec, the city was subjected to another siege—and another storming—that, though less celebrated, was vitally important to Americans in the early months oj their revolution. Read more »

The Battle That Won An Empire

By a brilliant maneuver young James Wolfe conquered “impregnable” Quebec—and secured North America for the English-speaking peoples

“This will, some time hence, be a vast empire, the seat of power and learning. … Nature has refused them nothing, and there will grow a people out of our little spot, England, that will fill this vast space, and divide this great portion of the globe with the Spaniards, who are possessed of the other half.”

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