April 1987

Volume 38
Issue 3

Features 

Within the city’s best-known landmarks and down its least-visited lanes stand surprisingly vivid mementos of our own national history

A journey through a wide and spellbinding land, and a look at the civilization along its edges.

No city has more energetically obliterated the remnants of its past. And yet no city has a greater sense of its history.

In the quiet luxury of the historic district, a unique form of house plan—which goes back two hundred years—is a beguiling surprise for a visitor

A biographer who knows it well tours Franklin Roosevelt’s home on the Hudson and finds it was not so much the President’s castle as it was his formidable mother’s.

In the blustery days of late fall, the traveler still can find the sparseness and solitude that so greatly pleased the Concord naturalist in 1849

Every town you pass through has felt the impact of the modern historic-preservation movement. Now a founder of that movement discusses what is real and what is fake in preservation efforts.

From Fort Ticonderoga to the Plaza Hotel, from Appomattox Courthouse to Bugsy Siegel’s weird rose garden in Las Vegas, the present-day scene is enriched by knowledge of the American past

April 1987

Departments 

CORRESPONDENCE

EDITORS’ BOOKSHELF

HISTORY HAPPENED HERE

LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

THE BUSINESS OF AMERICA

THE TIME MACHINE

THEN AND NOW