December 1965

Volume 17
Issue 1

Features 

For an American, there is an ironic clue to the history of our neighbor to the north; she became a nation because her people did not wish to be swallowed up by the United States Quant aux Canadiens français, ils ne voulaient pas seulement éviter être absorbés par les États-Unis; ils ne voulaient pas davantage être absorbés parleurs compatriotes “anglais”

At sixty-six his bones ached from the wounds of two wars, but as Southern pressure for secession mounted, “Old Sam Jacinto” battled to keep his beloved Texas in the Union

For three enthralled little boys in Oxford, Mississippi, the Space Age began one hot afternoon at the dawn of this century, when a balloon drifted aloft from the town square amid billows of smoke and whiskey fumes. One of the boys grew up to be Oxford’s most distinguished citizen, the famous novelist William Faulkner, who died in 1962. Another was his younger brother Murry, who writes this reminiscence of

For a century the piano was America’s radio, phonograph, and television set, as well as its finishing school and its supreme status symbol

Herr Doktor Albert was very careful with the Kaiser’s money. One day he saved a $1.25 taxi fare—and lost a million dollar’s worth of information

A SELECTION FROM CLARENCE P. HORNUNG’S GALLERY OF THE AMERICAN AUTOMOBILE

Anonymous

… aboard the Navy’s experimental new warship: the President, his lovely fiancée, members of the Cabinet, and most official Washington. The Captain pulled the landyard …

December 1965