December 1991

Volume 42
Issue 8

Features 

The American army that beat Hitler was thoroughly professional, but it didn’t start out that way. North Africa was where it learned the hard lessons—none harder than the disaster at Kasserine. This was the campaign that taught us how to fight a war.

Desperate improvisations in the face of imminent disaster saw us through the early years of the fight. They also gave us the war’s greatest movie.

An Airman’s Sketchbook

A MEMOIR OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR
Seeking the answer to a simple and terrible question: What was it like?

He wanted only what every journalist of the time did: an exclusive interview with the Duke of Windsor. What he got was an astonishing proposition that sent him on an urgent top-secret visit to the White House and a once-in-a-lifetime story that was too hot to print—until now.

Revisiting the seas where American carriers turned the course of history, a Navy man re-creates a time of frightful odds and brilliant gambles.

In 1941 the President understood better than many Americans the man who was running Germany, and Hitler understood Roosevelt and his country better than we knew

It took us longer to name the war than to fight it

December 1991

Departments 

AMERICAN MADE

CORRESPONDENCE

EDITORS’ BOOKSHELF

HISTORY HAPPENED HERE

IN THE NEWS

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

MY BRUSH WITH HISTORY

THE BUSINESS OF AMERICA

THE LIFE AND TIMES

THE TIME MACHINE