Peter Andrews

Peter Andrews is a contributing editor to American Heritage ; his story of how the U.S. forces in World War II learned their business the hard way in North Africa appeared in the December 1991 issue.

Articles by this Contributor

The American newspaper: beleaguered by television, hated both for its timidity and for its arrogance, biased, provincial, overweening—and still indispensable. A Hearst veteran tells how it got to where it is today, and where it may be headed. Read >>
When you’re lining up a putt on the close-cropped green, there are ghosts at your shoulder. More than any other game, golf is played with a sense of tradition. Read >>
The American army that beat Hitler was thoroughly professional, but it didn’t start out that way. North Africa was where it learned the hard lessons—none harder than the disaster at Kasserine. This was the campaign that taught us how to fight a war. Read >>
Lee. Grant. Jackson. Sherman. Thomas. Yes, George Henry Thomas belongs in that company. The trouble is that he and Grant never really got along. Read >>
In 1904 the Olympics took place for only the third time in the modern era. The place was St. Louis, where a world’s fair was providing all the glamour and glitter and excitement anyone could ask. The Games, on the other hand, were something else. Read >>
Every presidential election is exciting when it happens. Then the passing of time usually makes the outcome seem less than crucial. But after more than a century and a quarter, the election of 1860 retains its terrible urgency. Read >>
Their High Command abandoned them. Their enemy thought they wouldn’t fight. But a few days after Pearl Harbor, a handful of weary Americans gave the world a preview of what the Axis was up against. Read >>
… is more comfortable and safer than World War II’s “steel pot. ” The problem is that it looks just like the One Hitlers troops wore. Read >>
“I don’t want this thing often,” one soldier said of his .45 automatic pistol, “but when I do, I want it damned bad.” Read >>
But was Louis Moreau Gottschalk America’s first musical genius or simply the purveyor of sentimental claptrap? Read >>
A once laughable pursuit is now seen by historians as a serious way to explore where we came from and who we are Read >>
How a Courtly Game Became Big Business Read >>
The restaurant that changed the way we dine— Read >>
In the hands of a rococo Yankee named Clyde Fitch, the American stage came of age with a gasp of scandalized shock Read >>

"Web only stories" by this contributor