March 1989

Volume 40
Issue 2

Features 

At a time when many are concerned by the nation’s loss of the unassailable economic position it occupied just after World War II, one historian argues that our real strength—and our real peril—lie elsewhere

Seventy-five years ago Americans paid their first income tax. And liked it.

How Franklin Roosevelt’s Secretary of Agriculture sent an eccentric Russian mystic on a sensitive mission to Asia and thereby created diplomatic havoc, personal humiliation, and embarrassment for the administration

Slam Marshall, who is regarded as one of our great military historians, looked into the heart of combat and discovered a mystery there that raised doubts about the fighting quality of U.S. troops. But one GI thought he was a liar…

He ignored the conventions of his day and became one of the greatest American sculptors of this century

The more fiercely the Confederacy fought for its independence, the more bitterly divided it became. To fully understand the vast changes the war unleashed on the country, you must first understand the plight of the Southerners who didn’t want secession.

No less a fan than President Wilson said “The Birth of a Nation” was “like writing history with Lightning.” Movies have taught everybody else history too.

Anonymous
March 1989

Departments 

EDITORS’ BOOKSHELF

HISTORY HAPPENED HERE

IN THE NEWS

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

THE BUSINESS OF AMERICA

THE LIFE AND TIMES

THE TIME MACHINE