Fredric Smoler

Fredric Smoler's picture

Frederic Smoler has been teaching literature and history at Sarah Lawrence College since 1987; focusing on intellectual and literary history in Europe. He is the Adda Bozeman Chair in International Relations. In addition to his contributions to American Heritage, Smoler also writes for First of the Month, The Nation, and The Observer.

Articles by this Contributor

July/August 1988

VINTAGE 1929
Gallows Humor from the First October Catastrophe

July/August 1988

A lifelong student of military history and affairs says that nuclear weapons have made the idea of war absurd. And it is precisely when everyone agrees that war is absurd that one gets started.

March 1989

Slam Marshall, who is regarded as one of our great military historians, looked into the heart of combat and discovered a mystery there that raised doubts about the fighting quality of U.S. troops. But one GI thought he was a liar…

November 1990

What the past tells of America’s role in the current crisis is sometimes contradictory—but always worth listening to

May/June 1991

Those who believe America’s power is on the wane look to the example of Britain’s shockingly quick collapse. But the similarities may be less alarming than they seem.

February/March 1992

The fiercest struggle going on in education is about who owns the past. Militant multi-culturalists say that traditional history teaching has brushed out minority ethnic identities. Their opponents say that radical multiculturalism leads toward national fragmentation.

December 1992

For years people have argued that France had the real revolution and that ours was mild by comparison. But now a powerful new book says the American Revolution was the most sweeping in all history. It alone established a pure commercial culture—a culture that makes America the universal society we are today.

October 1993

A long-time Republican-party insider and close student of its past discusses how the party has changed over the years—for better and for worse —and where it may be headed.

February/march 1997

A historian of the ancient world believes that in every era humankind has reacted to the demands of waging war in surprisingly similar ways, and that to protect our national interests today Americans must understand the choices soldiers and statesmen made hundreds and even thousands of years ago