May/June 1988

Volume 39
Issue 4

Features 

It didn’t last long. But we never got over it.

In Clare Briggs’s cartoons nobody got chased by twenty cops, nobody broke a plank over the boss’s head, nobody’s eyes popped out on springs. People just acted the way people do, and as a result, the drawings still make us laugh.

Early in the century a young American accurately predicted Japan’s imperialism and China’s and Russia’s rise. Then he set out to become China’s soldier leader.

The distasteful questions we ask our presidential hopefuls serve a real purpose

In 1904 the Olympics took place for only the third time in the modern era. The place was St. Louis, where a world’s fair was providing all the glamour and glitter and excitement anyone could ask. The Games, on the other hand, were something else.

That was the question an Oklahoma high school teacher sent out in a handwritten note to men and women who had been prominent movers or observers during the Vietnam War. Politicians and journalists and generals and combat veterans answered him. Secretaries of Defense answered him. Presidents answered him. Taken together, the answers form a powerful and moving record of the national conscience.

May/June 1988

Departments 

EDITORS’ BOOKSHELF

HISTORY HAPPENED HERE

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

THE BUSINESS OF AMERICA

THE LIFE AND TIMES

THE TIME MACHINE