October 1957

Volume 8
Issue 6

Features 

American sea captain George Coggeshall tells of his experiences evading the British navy during the War of 1812 and spending over half a century at sea.

In the wild Southwest, Archbishop Lamy of Santa Fe contended with savage Indians, ignorance, and a recalcitrant clergy.

Professing humanitarian motives, he gave gangsters a word for their artillery and the world its first practicable machine gun.

The river that disappointed him bears his name, but Alexander Mackenzie’s great achievement in slogging to the Pacific is now almost forgotten.

Nicholas Roosevelt’s fire canoe transformed the Mississippi.

The great historian who so eloquently described the taking of Mexico and Peru won a great private victory of his own in the quiet of his study on Beacon Hill.

Even when death struck suddenly, the starry-eyed Indian agent was still dreaming of turning his Ute wards into white men overnight.

General Washington wanted Benedict Arnold taken alive, right in the heart of British-held New York.

Missives, one by Mark Twain, the other by Walt Whitman, reflect the impact of the Civil War on the nation.

Anonymous

While panic gripped the nation in 1893, Grover Cleveland suffered his own secret ordeal on a yacht in Long Island Sound.

In five dramatic allegorical paintings, Thomas Cole echoed the fear of Americans, over a century ago, that all civilizations, our own included, must someday perish.

October 1957

Departments 

READING, WRITING, AND HISTORY