September/October 1987

Volume 38
Issue 6

Features 

Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner for 150 Years

Anonymous

Modern technology enables the housewife to do much more in the house than ever before. That’s good- and not so good.

Of the thousands of American soldiers court-martialed for desertion in World War II, Eddie Slovik was the only one put to death. One of the judges who convicted him looks back with regret.

After a summer of debate, three of the delegates in Philadelphia could not bring themselves to put their names to the document they had worked so hard to create

An old, familiar show is back in Washington. There’s a new cast, of course, but the script is pretty much the same as ever. Here’s the program.

Elizabeth, Mary, and Sophia Peabody managed to extend the boundaries that cramped the lives of nineteenth-century women. Elizabeth introduced the kindergarten movement to America, Mary developed a new philosophy of mothering that we now take for granted, and Sophia was liberated from invalidism by her passionate love for her husband.

In a career that made her one of the greatest American artist of the century, Georgia O’Keeffe claimed to have done it all by herself—without influence from family, friends, or fellow artists. The real story is less romantic though just as extraordinary.

September/October 1987

Departments 

CORRESPONDENCE

EDITORS’ BOOKSHELF

HISTORY HAPPENED HERE

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

MATTERS OF FACT

POSTSCRIPTS TO HISTORY

THE BUSINESS OF AMERICA

THE TIME MACHINE

THEN AND NOW