The Gospel According To Eve

ELIZABETH CADY STANTON’S sardonic and biting protofeminist commentary on the Bible cost her the leadership of the suffragist movement

Eighty years old and bedridden, her legs no longer capable of supporting her 240-pound bulk, Elizabeth Cady Stanton was scarcely disposed to attend the annual convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association being held in Washington, D.C., in January of 1896. It was perhaps just as well. Even if she had shown up on her own two feet, the likelihood was that they would have been knocked out from under her. Stanton, together with her long-time friend and collaborator Susan B.Read more »

Susan B. Anthony Cast Her Ballot For Ulysses S. Grant

For this crime, she was arrested, held, indicted, and put on trial. Judge Hunt presided.

Shortly before the Republicans convened in Philadelphia in 1872 to renominate Ulysses S. Grant for President, Susan Brownell Anthony visited him at the White House. She told the President that her National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) wanted him to make votes for women a plank in his platform. Grant replied that he had “already done more for women than any other president.” He recognized the “right of women to be postmasters,” he said, and had named five thousand to the post, but he would make no promises about the party platform. Read more »

“a’n’t I A Woman?”

Sell the Shadow to Support the Substance.
SOJOURNER TRUTH

In the violent, restless decade before the Civil War some close ties were forged between the woman s-rights movement and abolitionism. The great feminist Susan B. Anthony, for instance, was a paid agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society, while Frederick Douglass, the black abolitionist, was a frequent speaker at woman’s-rights conventions. But if the relationship was occasionally a close one, it was rarely tranquil.Read more »

The Unsinkable Abigail

In forty years of scraping and scrapping for women’s rights, Abigail Scott Duniway never lost her nerve or wicked tongue

Man is, or should be, woman’s protector and defender. The natural and proper timidity and delicacy which belongs to the female sex evidently unfits it for many of the occupations of civil life.” Thus spake the United States Supreme Court in 1872 in upholding an Illinois statute barring women from practicing law, which a feminine aspirant to the bar had dared to challenge. Read more »

“I Was Arrested, Of Course…”

American women won the right to vote in 1920 largely through the controversial efforts of a young Quaker named Alice Paul. She was born in Moorestown, New Jersey, on January 11, 1885, seven years after the woman-suffrage amendment was first introduced in Congress. Over the years the so-called Susan B.
 

Read more »

Dynamic Victoria Woodhull

Her past was shady but her conscience was excellent,
and all in all she played a big part in the emancipation of women

 
 
 
 
 

Mrs. John Biddulph Martin, widow of a rich English banker and sister of the Viscountess of Montserrat, lived to the ripe old age of 89 and, in 1927 died in the odor of sanctity, much esteemed for her charitable works. Which was a scandal in the eyes of those who esteemed themselves as right-thinkers.

 
 
 
 
 
Read more »