August 1967

Volume 18
Issue 5

Features 

How a bunch of the boys—and some of the girls, too—slogged up to the gold diggings in the Yukon; and how Hegg the photographer joined in the scramble, leaving a record of one of the most rugged adventures of modern times.

Newspaperman, novelist, playwright, adventurer, Richard Harding Davis was a legend in his own lifetime.

Anonymous

Maria Mitchell studied the stars, and taught her students to reach for them.

Anonymous

Ruminations of E. L. Godkin and Charles Eliot Norton.

Fifty years ago America went into World War I—singing. Irving Berlin, who put some of the songs upon our lips, recalls for American Heritage those gallant and somehow marvelously innocent days.

As with Lincoln, assassination lifted John F. Kennedy to a beatified myth, in large part because of the guidelines set for books about him.

For over a century the colony was the feudal property of the Lords Baltimore. It turned out to be a fee of troubles.

He never packed a gun or led a posse or burned down a homesteader's hut, but in his time Henry Miller owned more land than anyone else in the West.

Verdicts Of History: III -- Even his abolitionist friends thought his attack on Harpers Ferry insane, but the old Kansas raider sensed that his death would ignite the nation’s conscience.

As featureless new buildings replace the old, the faces of our cities are going blank. But evocative relics of an earlier, ornate age are being rescued, to stand once more in a unique garden in Brooklyn.

August 1967